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President Woodrow Wilson


Self Description

October 2001: Born in 1856. A political science professor and later President of Princeton University, Governor of New Jersey, President of the United States 1913-1921 (during World War I). Primary champion of the League of Nations, predecessor organization to the United Nations. Died 1924. http://www.whitehouse.gov/history/presidents/ww28.html

Third-Party Descriptions

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Founder/Co-Founder of League of Nations Organization May 23, 2005
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) New Jersey (State Government) Organization May 23, 2005
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Princeton University Organization May 23, 2005
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) US Federal Government - Executive Branch Organization Dec 21, 2005
Advised by (past or present) Bernard Mannes Baruch Person Dec 1, 2006
Opponent (past or present) Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes Person Aug 1, 2011
Supervisor of (past or present) Alexander Mitchell Palmer Esq. Person Sep 6, 2006
Successor to Opponent (past or present) President William Howard Taft Person Jul 16, 2006

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Nov 19, 2014 A Rape on Campus: A Brutal Assault and Struggle for Justice at UVA

QUOTE: UVA's emphasis on honor is so pronounced that since 1998, 183 people have been expelled for honor-code violations such as cheating on exams. And yet paradoxically, not a single student at UVA has ever been expelled for sexual assault. "Think about it," says Susan Russell, whose UVA daughter's sexual-assault report helped trigger a previous federal investigation. "In what world do you get kicked out for cheating, but if you rape someone, you can stay?"

Rolling Stone
Aug 25, 2011 In Echo of Pancho Villa, Modern Raid Shakes a Town on the Edge of Extinction

QUOTE: Ninety-five years and a day after the infamous Villa raid, another group of armed men crept into Columbus [New Mexico]....They led away in handcuffs Columbus’s mayor, police chief, village trustee and numerous others accused of smuggling guns, ammunition and body armor across the border to Mexican outlaws.

New York Times
Oct 29, 2008 Most Presidents Ignore the Constitution: The government we have today is something the Founders could never have imagined.

QUOTE: It is clear that the Framers wrote a Constitution as a result of which contracts would be enforced, risk would be real, choices would be free and have consequences, and private property would be sacrosanct. The $700 billion bailout of large banks that Congress recently enacted runs afoul of virtually all these constitutional principles.

Wall Street Journal, The (WSJ)
Dec 21, 2005 Clash Is Latest Chapter in Bush Effort to Widen Executive Power

QUOTE: From shielding energy policy deliberations to setting up military tribunals without court involvement, Bush, with Cheney's encouragement, has taken what scholars call a more expansive view of his role than any commander in chief in decades. With few exceptions, Congress and the courts have largely stayed out of the way, deferential to the argument that a president needs free rein, especially in wartime.

Washington Post
Dec 18, 2005 Pushing the Limits Of Wartime Powers

QUOTE: In his four-year campaign against al Qaeda, President Bush has turned the U.S. national security apparatus inward to secretly collect information on American citizens on a scale unmatched since the intelligence reforms of the 1970s....the third time in as many months that the White House has been obliged to defend a departure from previous restraints on domestic surveillance. In each case, the Bush administration concealed the program's dimensions or existence from the public and from most members of Congress.

Washington Post
Oct 03, 2001 Democracy in Wartime

QUOTE: Yet Congress has shown alarming signs of abdicating its constitutional role...giving President George W. Bush a blank check -- which is more than Congress gave Franklin D. Roosevelt 60 years ago.

New York Times