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Time Warner Cable


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Third-Party Descriptions

June 2016: "Water and heat are regulated utilities. But when it comes to Internet access, people in apartments (called Multiple Dwelling Units, or MDUs) often have the worst of both worlds: all the limitations of a utility framework — no competition, no choices — with zero protections for consumers. That means unconstrained pricing. Network operators like Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and AT&T, in cahoots with developers and landlords, routinely use a breathtaking array of kickbacks, lawyerly games of Twister, blunt threats, and downright illegal activities to lock up buildings in exclusive arrangements."

https://backchannel.com/the-new-payola-deals-landlords-cut-with-internet-providers-cf60200aa9e9#.o9aqytv63

December 2010: 'Many others sounded more satisfied by Tuesday’s decision. Comcast and Time Warner Cable each separately said the F.C.C. had struck a “workable balance,” and AT&T said the compromise appeared “to balance major differences.”'

http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/12/21/f-c-c-approves-net-rules-and-braces-for-fight

June 2008: "Verizon, Sprint and Time Warner Cable have agreed to block access to Internet bulletin boards and Web sites nationwide that disseminate child pornography."

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/10/nyregion/10internet.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Member of (past or present) Center for Copyright Information (CCI) Organization Mar 3, 2013
Owned by (partial or full, past or present) Time Warner Organization Jun 11, 2008

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jun 27, 2016 Dear Landlord: Don’t Rip Me Off When it Comes To Internet Access When building owners get kickbacks from big providers it’s the tenants who lose

QUOTE: Water and heat are regulated utilities. But when it comes to Internet access, people in apartments (called Multiple Dwelling Units, or MDUs) often have the worst of both worlds: all the limitations of a utility framework — no competition, no choices — with zero protections for consumers. That means unconstrained pricing. Network operators like Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and AT&T, in cahoots with developers and landlords, routinely use a breathtaking array of kickbacks, lawyerly games of Twister, blunt threats, and downright illegal activities to lock up buildings in exclusive arrangements.

Backchannel
Jul 07, 2011 To Slow Piracy, Internet Providers Ready Penalties

QUOTE: After years of negotiations with Hollywood and the music industry, the nation’s top Internet providers have agreed to a systematic approach to identifying customers suspected of digital copyright infringement and then alerting them via e-mail or other means....concerns that consumers might be punished “based on allegations that have not been tested in court.”

New York Times
Mar 28, 2011 Dispute Over Time Warner Cable’s Streaming to iPad Bursts Into the Open

QUOTE: Time Warner Cable started streaming several dozen TV channels to customers’ iPads. Immediately, channel owners like Viacom and Scripps Networks seized on the streaming capability as a contract violation — in part because they want cable companies to pay them more for the privilege to stream.

New York Times
Dec 21, 2010 F.C.C. Approves Net Rules and Braces for Fight (Media Decoder)

QUOTE: The new rules [approved by the FCC-- Ed.] are, at best, net semi-neutrality. They ban any outright blocking and any “unreasonable discrimination” of Web sites or applications by fixed-line broadband providers, but they afford more wiggle room to wireless providers like AT&T and Verizon.

New York Times
Nov 04, 2008 AT&T Tries Out Bandwidth Caps

QUOTE: The days of all-you-can-eat bandwidth appear to be numbered. AT&T, one of the largest broadband providers in the country, has set usage caps as an experiment....setting limits on broadband use in an attempt to crackdown on so-called "bandwidth hogs."

Wired
Jun 10, 2008 Net Providers to Block Sites With Child Sex

QUOTE: The move is part of a groundbreaking agreement with the New York attorney general, Andrew M. Cuomo, that will be formally announced on Tuesday as a significant step by leading companies to curtail access to child pornography.

New York Times