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National Security Agency (NSA)


Self Description

August 2013: "The National Security Agency/Central Security Service (NSA/CSS) is home to America's codemakers and codebreakers. The National Security Agency has provided timely information to U.S. decision makers and military leaders for more than half a century. The Central Security Service was established in 1972 to promote a full partnership between NSA and the cryptologic elements of the armed forces.

NSA/CSS is unique among the U.S. defense agencies because of our government-wide responsibilities. NSA/CSS provides products and services to the Department of Defense, the Intelligence Community, government agencies, industry partners, and select allies and coalition partners. In addition, we deliver critical strategic and tactical information to war planners and war fighters.

By its very nature, what NSA/CSS does as a key member of the Intelligence Community requires a high degree of confidentiality. Our Information Assurance mission confronts the formidable challenge of preventing foreign adversaries from gaining access to sensitive or classified national security information. Our Signals Intelligence mission collects, processes, and disseminates intelligence information from foreign signals for intelligence and counterintelligence purposes and to support military operations. This Agency also enables Network Warfare operations to defeat terrorists and their organizations at home and abroad, consistent with U.S. laws and the protection of privacy and civil liberties.

NSA/CSS exists to protect the Nation. Our customers know they can count on us to provide what they need, when they need it, wherever they need it."

http://www.nsa.gov/about/index.shtml

Third-Party Descriptions

December 2014: "Obama rejected such criticism of the whistleblowing system after National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden pointed to the leak prosecution of an NSA whistleblower as one of the reasons he’d decided to go to the news media about the spy agency’s collection of Americans’ data."

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/static/features/Whistleblowers/Whistleblowers-remain-mired-in-broken-system.html

May 2014: "The Snowden leaks also pushed the Justice Department to admit – contrary to what it told the court – that the government hadn't been notifying any defendants they were being charged based on NSA surveillance, making it actually impossible for anyone to prove they had standing to challenge the Fisa Amendments Act as unconstitutional."

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/may/17/government-lies-nsa-justice-department-supreme-court

January 2014: "But in a speech at the Justice Department that seemed more calculated to reassure audiences at home and abroad than to force radical change, Mr. Obama defended the need for the broad surveillance net assembled by the N.S.A. And he turned to Congress and the intelligence agencies themselves to work out the details of any changes."

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/18/us/politics/obama-nsa.html

December 2013: "A Reuters news story published a week ago raised disturbing questions about the relationship between the NSA and RSA Security (now a division of EMC), a prominent vendor of cryptographic technologies. The article claims that RSA entered into a $10 million contract that required, among other things, that RSA make the (not yet standardized) DUAL_EC_DRBG random number generator the default in its widely used BSAFE cryptographic library. BSAFE is used internally for RSA’s products as well as by other vendors, who license it from RSA to develop their own products around it. A couple days later, RSA issued a response, in which it denies that it deliberately weakened its products, but is silent about most of the claims in the Reuters piece."

http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/12/what-we-really-lost-with-the-rsa-nsa-revelations/

December 2013: 'WASHINGTON — A federal district judge ruled on Monday that the National Security Agency program that is systematically keeping records of all Americans’ phone calls most likely violates the Constitution, describing its technology as “almost Orwellian” and suggesting that James Madison would be “aghast” to learn that the government was encroaching on liberty in such a way.'

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/17/us/politics/federal-judge-rules-against-nsa-phone-data-program.html

October 2013: "Dozens of lawmakers from both parties introduced legislation Tuesday to rein in the National Security Agency's spying powers."

http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/331199-usa-freedom-act-would-curb-nsa-power

September 2013: "(CNN) -- The National Security Agency's internal watchdog detailed a dozen instances in the past decade in which its employees intentionally misused the agency's surveillance power, in some cases to snoop on their love interests."

http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/27/politics/nsa-snooping/index.html

September 2013: "The National Security Agency is winning its long-running secret war on encryption, using supercomputers, technical trickery, court orders and behind-the-scenes persuasion to undermine the major tools protecting the privacy of everyday communications in the Internet age, according to newly disclosed documents."

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/06/us/nsa-foils-much-internet-encryption.html

August 2013: "The pattern is now clear and it's getting old. With each new revelation the government comes out with a new story for why things are really just fine, only to have that assertion demolished by the next revelation. It's time for those in government who want to rebuild the trust of the American people and others all over the world to come clean and take some actual steps to rein in the NSA. And if they don't, the American people and the public, adversarial courts, must force change upon it."

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2013/08/nsa-spying-three-pillars-government-trust-have-fallen

July 2013: "WASHINGTON — In more than a dozen classified rulings, the nation’s surveillance court has created a secret body of law giving the National Security Agency the power to amass vast collections of data on Americans while pursuing not only terrorism suspects, but also people possibly involved in nuclear proliferation, espionage and cyberattacks, officials say."

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/07/us/in-secret-court-vastly-broadens-powers-of-nsa.html

October 2007: "A former Qwest Communications International executive, appealing a conviction for insider trading, has alleged that the government withdrew opportunities for contracts worth hundreds of millions of dollars after Qwest refused to participate in an unidentified National Security Agency program that the company thought might be illegal."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/12/AR2007101202485.html

June 2013: "National Security Agency Director Gen. Keith B. Alexander acknowledged Tuesday that a fact sheet on the agency’s Web site inaccurately described the extent to which the communications of U.S. citizens are protected from the spy agency’s collection of e-mail and other material from technology companies."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/nsa-fact-sheet-on-surveillance-program-pulled-from-web-after-senators-criticism/2013/06/25/afe95d9e-ddda-11e2-b797-cbd4cb13f9c6_story.html

June 2013: "The Obama administration for more than two years permitted the National Security Agency to continue collecting vast amounts of records detailing the email and internet usage of Americans, according to secret documents obtained by the Guardian."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/27/nsa-data-mining-authorised-obama

March 2012: "Much of the debate over phone surveillance in recent years has focused on the federal government and counterterrorism operations, particularly a once-secret program authorized by President George W. Bush after the Sept. 11 attacks. It allowed the National Security Agency to eavesdrop on phone calls of terrorism suspects and monitor huge amounts of phone and e-mail traffic without court-approved intelligence warrants."

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/01/us/police-tracking-of-cellphones-raises-privacy-fears.html

June 2011: "The problems of perception that plagued the government’s pursuit of Mr. Drake, who claimed to be a whistle-blower exposing a costly National Security Agency boondoggle, may crop up again with Mr. Kim. His personal story as a brainy, up-by-the-bootstraps immigrant is compelling, even if the government is able to prove that he was far too candid in talking to a reporter about intelligence in 2009 and then lied to F.B.I. agents about the episode."

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/18/us/politics/18leak.html

March 2010: "WASHINGTON — A federal judge ruled Wednesday that the National Security Agency’s program of surveillance without warrants was illegal, rejecting the Obama administration’s effort to keep shrouded in secrecy one of the most disputed counterterrorism policies of former President George W. Bush."

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/01/us/01nsa.html

July 2009: "As mentioned above, NSA is probably crawling the sudden explosion of social networking tools, making links between individuals and using data-mining technologies to construct elaborate maps of who associate with whom. This may seem like a wild allegation, but we know that the Department of Defense (of which the NSA is a part) was exploring exactly this sort of social network mapping under the Total Information Awareness (TIA) program that was uncovered not long after 9/11."

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2009/07/effs-new-lawsuit-and-how-the-nsa-is-into-social-networking.ars

July 2009: "The Obama administration will proceed with a Bush-era plan to use National Security Agency assistance in screening government computer traffic on private-sector networks, with AT&T as the likely test site, according to three current and former government officials."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/07/02/AR2009070202771.html

June 2009: "Much of the new military command’s work is expected to be carried out by the National Security Agency, whose role in intercepting the domestic end of international calls and e-mail messages after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, under secret orders issued by the Bush administration, has already generated intense controversy."

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/13/us/politics/13cyber.html

June 2009: "Defense officials are creating the command to defend military networks and develop offensive cyber-weapons, based on a strategy that brings together the military's cyber-warriors and the National Security Agency, the organization responsible for electronic espionage."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/06/12/AR2009061204373.html

January 2009: "The decision marks the first time since the disclosure of the National Security Agency’s warrantless eavesdropping program three years ago that an appellate court has addressed the constitutionality of the federal government’s wiretapping powers. In validating the government’s wide authority to collect foreign intelligence, it may offer legal credence to the Bush administration’s repeated assertions that the president has constitutional authority to act without specific court approval in ordering national security eavesdropping."

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/16/washington/16fisa.html

October 2008: "The U.S. Senate is investigating allegations by two National Security Agency whistleblowers who have described widespread monitoring of innocuous telephone conversations by the Bush administration's clandestine program."

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-10063138-38.html

July 2008: "The judge, Vaughn R. Walker, the chief judge for the Northern District of California, made his findings in a ruling on a lawsuit brought by an Oregon charity. The group says it has evidence of an illegal wiretap used against it by the National Security Agency under the secret surveillance program established by President Bush after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001."

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/03/washington/03fisa.html

June 2008: "In 2005, Bush acknowledged that he ordered the National Security Agency to intercept communications between U.S. residents and people overseas suspected of having ties to terrorism. The administration insists that the program was authorized when Congress approved military action against al Qaeda after the terrorist network's 2001 attacks."

http://edition.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/06/20/congress.wiretaps/index.html

June 2008: "The immunity would cover companies that helped the government between Sept. 11, 2001, and Jan. 17, 2007, when the warrantless surveillance program was brought under the authority of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. That program had allowed the National Security Agency to monitor communications to and from the United States without court oversight."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/06/19/AR2008061901545.html

June 2008: "In the wiretapping program approved by Mr. Bush after the Sept. 11 attacks, the White House asserted that the president had the constitutional authority to act outside the courts in allowing the National Security Agency to focus on the international communications of Americans with suspected ties to terrorists and that Congress had implicitly authorized that power when it voted to use military force against Al Qaeda."

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/20/washington/20fisa.html

February 2008: 'Waterboarding, he told the House committee, "cannot possibly be the subject of . . . a Justice Department investigation" because its use was approved by the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel. Mukasey made a parallel argument about the National Security Agency's warrantless wiretapping program, saying the Justice Department could not investigate that program because it was approved at the outset by the department's lawyers.'

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/02/07/AR2008020701542.html

January 2008: "The temporary surveillance law -- approved under heavy White House pressure -- gives the government broad powers to eavesdrop on the communications of terrorism suspects without warrants. It effectively legalized many of the practices employed by the National Security Agency as part of a secret program approved by Bush in late 2001."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/01/23/AR2008012302179.html

January 2008: "US signals intelligence – the much-vaunted ability of American military and spy units to eavesdrop on the radio calls and other electronic communications of an adversary – failed at crucial moments during the Vietnam War, according to a just-declassified National Security Agency history of the effort."

http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0109/p04s01-usmi.html

October 2007: The interrogation opinions were signed by Steven G. Bradbury, who since 2005 has headed the elite Office of Legal Counsel at the Justice Department. He has become a frequent public defender of the National Security Agency’s domestic surveillance program and detention policies at Congressional hearings and press briefings, a role that some legal scholars say is at odds with the office’s tradition of avoiding political advocacy.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/04/washington/04interrogate.html

September 2007: The same state-secrets issue is also at the center of a string of lawsuits challenging the Bush administration's warrantless surveillance operations by the National Security Agency. The Ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco heard two cases last month involving alleged NSA surveillance within the US.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0919/p01s08-usju.html

September 2007: The intelligence officials, including the directors of the C.I.A., the F.B.I. and the National Security Agency, said in court filings that the vast disclosure would reveal counterterrorism activities and could disrupt intelligence gathering. They also said assembling the information was so time-consuming that the effort had distracted the agencies from terrorism investigations.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/12/washington/12gitmo.html

August 2007: The expanded snooping powers of the National Security Agency (NSA) have been controversial ever since they became public in 2006. To critics, the program opens the door to the possibility of dangerous infringement on the civil liberties of US citizens. To supporters, they're a necessary tool against terrorism in an era of cellphones and Internet communications.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0822/p01s03-uspo.html

August 2007: Civil liberties and privacy groups have denounced the administration's proposal, which they say would effectively allow the National Security Agency to revive a warrantless surveillance program conducted in secret from 2001 until late 2005. They say it would also give the government authority to force carriers to turn over any international communications into and out of the United States without a court order.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/07/31/AR2007073101879.html

June 2007: U.S. intelligence agencies have always relied on private companies for technology and hardware. Lockheed built the famous U-2 spy plane under specifications from the CIA, and dozens of companies, from TRW to Polaroid to Raytheon, helped develop the high-resolution cameras and satellites that beamed information back to Washington about the Soviet Union and its military and missile installations. The National Security Agency, which was founded in the early 1950s to monitor foreign communications and telephone calls, hired IBM, Cray and other companies to make the supercomputers that helped the agency break encryption codes and transform millions of bits of data into meaningful intelligence.

http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2007/06/01/intel_contractors/

February 2007: The deal appears to resolve the latest conflict between Congress and the administration over the National Security Agency's surveillance effort, and it provides new evidence of the administration's more accommodating approach to the Democrats who now control Congress.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/01/31/AR2007013100921.html

January 2006: On Oct. 1, 2001, three weeks after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, Gen. Michael V. Hayden, who was running the National Security Agency at the time, told the House intelligence committee that the agency was broadening its surveillance authorities, according to a newly released letter sent to him that month by Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (Calif.). Pelosi, the ranking Democrat on the committee, raised concerns in the letter, which was declassified with several redactions and made public yesterday by her staff.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/03/AR2006010301460.html

January 2006: Information captured by the National Security Agency's secret eavesdropping on communications between the United States and overseas has been passed on to other government agencies, which cross-check the information with tips and information collected in other databases, current and former administration officials said.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/31/AR2005123100808.html

December 2005: Nor did he explain why the current system is not quick enough to meet the needs of the fight against terrorism. Under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the NSA in urgent situations can already eavesdrop on international telephone calls for 72 hours without a warrant, as long as it goes to a secret intelligence court by the end of that period for retroactive permission. Since the law was passed in 1978 after intelligence scandals, the court has rejected just five of 18,748 requests for wiretaps and search warrants, according to the government.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/19/AR2005121900211.html

December 2005: Congressional leaders of both parties called for hearings and issued condemnations yesterday in the wake of reports that President Bush signed a secret order in 2002 allowing the National Security Agency to spy on hundreds of U.S. citizens and other residents without court-approved warrants.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/16/AR2005121601825.html

December 2005: WASHINGTON, Dec. 1 - The National Security Agency has released hundreds of pages of long-secret documents on the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin incident, which played a critical role in significantly expanding the American commitment to the Vietnam War.

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/02/politics/02tonkin.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Cooperation (past or present) AT&T Organization Aug 12, 2006
Opponent (past or present) Al-Haramain Islamic Foundation Organization Apr 1, 2010
Cooperation (past or present) Facebook Organization Sep 5, 2013
Cooperation (past or present) Google Organization Sep 5, 2013
Owned by (partial or full, past or present) Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) Organization Feb 8, 2007
Cooperation (past or present) RSA Security Organization Dec 27, 2013
Opponent (past or present) Silent Circle Organization Sep 5, 2013
Opponent (past or present) Organization Executive (past or present) Thomas A. Drake Organization Jun 18, 2011
Owned by (partial or full, past or present) US Federal Government - Independent Agencies Organization May 6, 2005
Cooperation (past or present) Yahoo! Organization Sep 5, 2013
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Opponent (past or present) Research/Analysis Subject Matthew M. Aid Person May 10, 2010
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) General Keith B. Alexander Person Jun 28, 2013
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Gen. Lew Allen Jr. Person Jan 3, 2006
Opponent (past or present) Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) William Edward Binney Person Sep 17, 2013
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Thomas Andrew Drake Person Sep 17, 2013
Opponent (past or present) Glenn Greenwald Esq. Person Sep 5, 2013
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Robert J. Hanyok Person Dec 2, 2005
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Gen. Michael V. Hayden Person Dec 18, 2005
Opponent (past or present) Ladar Levison Person Sep 5, 2013
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Vice Adm. John "Mike" M. McConnell Retd. Person Jul 9, 2007
Organization Executive (past or present) Prof. Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker Esq. Person Jan 14, 2007
Organization Executive (past or present) James A. Protin Esq. Person Jan 2, 2015
Opponent (past or present) Sen. Bernard "Bernie" Sanders Person Jun 29, 2016
Organization Executive (past or present) O. Sami Saydjari MS Person Jan 6, 2008
Advised by (past or present) Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Paul B. Schneck Ph.D. Person May 2, 2007
Opponent (past or present) Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Edward Joseph Snowden Person Jun 28, 2013
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Opponent (past or present) Russell D. Tice Person Sep 17, 2013
Opponent (past or present) Senator Ron Wyden Esq. Person Jun 28, 2013

Articles and Resources

126 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 20]   [End]

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Dec 30, 2014 Intelligence, defense whistleblowers remain mired in broken system

QUOTE: Since 9/11, defense and intelligence whistleblowers such as Greenstein have served as America’s conscience in the war on terrorism. Their assertions go to the heart of government waste, misconduct and overreach: defective military equipment, prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib, surveillance of Americans. Yet the legal system that was set up to protect these employees has repeatedly failed those with the highest-profile claims. Many of them say they aren’t thanked but instead are punished for speaking out. More than 8,700 defense and intelligence employees and contractors have filed retaliation claims with the Pentagon inspector general since the 9/11 attacks, with the number increasing virtually every year...

McClatchy DC
May 17, 2014 Everyone should know just how much the government lied to defend the NSA

QUOTE: A web of deception has finally been untangled: the Justice Department got the US supreme court to dismiss a case that could have curtailed the NSA's dragnet.

Guardian Unlimited
Jan 17, 2014 Obama Outlines Calibrated Curbs on Phone Spying

QUOTE: in a speech at the Justice Department that seemed more calculated to reassure audiences at home and abroad than to force radical change, Mr. Obama defended the need for the broad surveillance net assembled by the N.S.A. And he turned to Congress and the intelligence agencies themselves to work out the details of any changes.

New York Times
Dec 27, 2013 How Worried Should We Be About the Alleged RSA-NSA Scheming?

QUOTE: If the NSA sabotaged a secure random number generator in a widely used commercial library, it used an extremely blunt instrument....There’s far more at stake here than NSA’s reputation or RSA’s and other U.S. business interests, however. We urgently need NSA and RSA to come clean with the public so we can begin to unravel the damage that’s been done to the basic mechanisms of trust in our online world.

Wired
Dec 16, 2013 Judge Questions Legality of N.S.A. Phone Records

QUOTE: A federal district judge ruled on Monday that the National Security Agency program that is systematically keeping records of all Americans’ phone calls most likely violates the Constitution, describing its technology as “almost Orwellian” and suggesting that James Madison would be “aghast” to learn that the government was encroaching on liberty in such a way.

New York Times
Oct 29, 2013 Lawmakers propose USA Freedom Act to curb NSA’s powers

QUOTE: Dozens of lawmakers from both parties introduced legislation Tuesday to rein in the National Security Agency's spying powers. The USA Freedom Act, which has 16 co-sponsors in the Senate and more than 70 in the House, would end the agency's massive phone record collection program — one of the most controversial revelations from the leaks by Edward Snowden.

The Hill
Sep 27, 2013 NSA: Some used spying power to snoop on lovers

QUOTE: The National Security Agency's internal watchdog detailed a dozen instances in the past decade in which its employees intentionally misused the agency's surveillance power, in some cases to snoop on their love interests...there are two additional incidents now under investigation and another allegation pending that may require an investigation.

CNN (Cable News Network)
Sep 15, 2013 The Banality of Systemic Evil (THE STONE)

QUOTE: Clearly, there is a moral principle at work in the actions of the leakers, whistle-blowers and hacktivists and those who support them. I would also argue that that moral principle has been clearly articulated, and it may just save us from a dystopian future. In “Eichmann in Jerusalem,” one of the most poignant and important works of 20th-century philosophy, Hannah Arendt made an observation about what she called “the banality of evil.” One interpretation of this holds that it was not an observation about what a regular guy Adolph Eichmann seemed to be, but rather a statement about what happens when people play their “proper” roles within a system....A good illustration of this phenomenon appears in “Moral Mazes,” a book by the sociologist Robert Jackall that explored the ethics of decision making within several corporate bureaucracies.

New York Times
Sep 05, 2013 N.S.A. Foils Much Internet Encryption

QUOTE: The National Security Agency is winning its long-running secret war on encryption, using supercomputers, technical trickery, court orders and behind-the-scenes persuasion to undermine the major tools protecting the privacy of everyday communications in the Internet age, according to newly disclosed documents. The agency has circumvented or cracked much of the encryption, or digital scrambling, that guards global commerce and banking systems, protects sensitive data like trade secrets and medical records, and automatically secures the e-mails, Web searches, Internet chats and phone calls of Americans and others around the world...

New York Times
Aug 18, 2013 Glenn Greenwald's partner detained at Heathrow airport for nine hours David Miranda, partner of Guardian interviewer of whistleblower Edward Snowden, questioned under Terrorism Act

QUOTE: "This is a profound attack on press freedoms and the news gathering process," Greenwald said. "To detain my partner for a full nine hours while denying him a lawyer, and then seize large amounts of his possessions, is clearly intended to send a message of intimidation to those of us who have been reporting on the NSA and GCHQ. The actions of the UK pose a serious threat to journalists everywhere."

Guardian Unlimited
Jul 06, 2013 In Secret, Court Vastly Broadens Powers of N.S.A.

QUOTE: In more than a dozen classified rulings, the nation’s surveillance court has created a secret body of law giving the National Security Agency the power to amass vast collections of data on Americans while pursuing not only terrorism suspects, but also people possibly involved in nuclear proliferation, espionage and cyberattacks...

New York Times
Jun 27, 2013 NSA collected US email records in bulk for more than two years under Obama

QUOTE: The Obama administration for more than two years permitted the National Security Agency to continue collecting vast amounts of records detailing the email and internet usage of Americans...under the program, launched in 2001, a federal judge sitting on the secret surveillance panel called the Fisa court would approve a bulk collection order for internet metadata "every 90 days"... The collection of these records began under the Bush administration's wide-ranging warrantless surveillance program, collectively known by the NSA codename Stellar Wind.

Guardian Unlimited
Jun 25, 2013 NSA fact sheet on surveillance program pulled from Web after senators’ criticism

QUOTE: National Security Agency Director Gen. Keith B. Alexander acknowledged Tuesday that a fact sheet on the agency’s Web site inaccurately described the extent to which the communications of U.S. citizens are protected from the spy agency’s collection of e-mail and other material from technology companies.

Washington Post
Jun 25, 2013 Who will stop Google? Snowden revealed what many of us already suspected: Google completely controls the web

QUOTE: What do the U.S. government and Silicon Valley already have in common? Above all, they want to remain opaque while making the rest of us entirely transparent through the capture of our data. What is arising is simply a new form of government, involving vast entities with the reach and power of government and little accountability to anyone. Google, the company with the motto “Don’t be evil,” is rapidly becoming an empire. Not an empire of territory, as was Rome or the Soviet Union, but an empire controlling our access to data and our data itself. Antitrust lawsuits proliferating around the company demonstrate its quest for monopoly control over information in the information age.

Salon
Mar 31, 2012 Police Are Using Phone Tracking as a Routine Tool

QUOTE: Law enforcement tracking of cellphones, once the province mainly of federal agents, has become a powerful and widely used surveillance tool for local police officials, with hundreds of departments, large and small, often using it aggressively with little or no court oversight, documents show. The practice has become big business for cellphone companies, too...

New York Times
Jun 17, 2011 U.S. Pressing Its Crackdown Against Leaks

QUOTE: The Justice Department shows no sign of rethinking its campaign to punish unauthorized disclosures to the news media, with five criminal cases so far under President Obama, compared with three under all previous presidents combined....The string of cases reflects a broad belief across two administrations and in both parties in Congress that leaks have gotten out of hand, endangering intelligence agents and exposing American spying methods.

New York Times
May 31, 2011 Pentagon to Consider Cyberattacks Acts of War

QUOTE: The Pentagon, trying to create a formal strategy to deter cyberattacks on the United States, plans to issue a new strategy soon declaring that a computer attack from a foreign nation can be considered an act of war that may result in a military response.

New York Times
Apr 27, 2011 Honoring Those Who Said No

QUOTE: Thus far, though, our official history has honored only those who approved torture, not those who rejected it… But averting our eyes from recent history means not only that we fail in our legal and moral duty to provide redress to victims of torture, but also that we betray the public servants who risked so much to reverse what they knew was a disastrous and shameful course.

New York Times
Mar 31, 2010 Federal Judge Finds N.S.A. Wiretaps Were Illegal

QUOTE: A federal judge ruled Wednesday that the National Security Agency’s program of surveillance without warrants was illegal, rejecting the Obama administration’s effort to keep shrouded in secrecy one of the most disputed counterterrorism policies of former President George W. Bush.

New York Times
Jan 31, 2010 Obama admnistration takes several wrong paths in dealing with terrorism

QUOTE: Some may celebrate that the current Justice Department's perspective on the war on terrorism has become markedly more dominant in the past year. We should probably understand the implications of that before we break out the champagne. That apparently no one recommended on Christmas Day that Abdulmutallab be handled, at least for a time, as an enemy combatant should be concerning.

Washington Post

126 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 20]   [End]