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Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)


Self Description

August 2002: "The mission of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is to save lives, prevent injuries and protect the health of America's workers. To accomplish this, federal and state governments must work in partnership with the more than 100 million working men and women and their six and a half million employers who are covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970....OSHA and its state partners have approximately 2100 inspectors, plus complaint discrimination investigators, engineers, physicians, educators, standards writers, and other technical and support personnel spread over more than 200 offices throughout the country. This staff establishes protective standards, enforces those standards, and reaches out to employers and employees through technical assistance and consultation programs." http://www.osha.gov/oshinfo/mission.html

Third-Party Descriptions

May 2010: "Even the head of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration acknowledges that his agency’s 20th-century rules have not yet caught up with the 21st-century biotech industry."

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/28/business/28hazard.html

May 2010: "For example, last year the Occupational Safety and Health Administration found more than 700 violations at the Texas City refinery — many concerning faulty valves, which are critical for safety given the high temperatures and pressures. The agency fined BP a record $87.4 million, which was more than four times the previous record fine, also to BP, for the 2005 explosion."

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/09/business/09bp.html

November 2009: "Employers and workers routinely underreport work-related injuries and illnesses, calling into question the accuracy of nationwide data that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration compiles each year, the Government Accountability Office said Monday."

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/17/us/17osha.html

December 2008: "Current and former career officials at OSHA say that such sagas were a recurrent feature during the Bush administration, as political appointees ordered the withdrawal of dozens of workplace health regulations, slow-rolled others, and altered the reach of its warnings and rules in response to industry pressure."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/12/28/AR2008122802124.html

July 2008: "(UWIRE) -- Princeton University's policy of not allowing its officers to carry guns on campus doesn't hurt the officers' ability to do their jobs, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration ruled."

http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/07/08/osha.guns/index.html

April 2007: Since George W. Bush became president, OSHA has issued the fewest significant standards in its history, public health experts say. It has imposed only one major safety rule. The only significant health standard it issued was ordered by a federal court.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/04/25/washington/25osha.html

Date Unknown: Consistent application of a policy is an issue behind a recent lawsuit that arose after Ameritech Corp. asked three of its telephone line technicians to lose the jewelry, or lose the job. The company claimed that facial jewelry could be a potential safety hazard. The employees fought the 'safety-based' policy and were subsequently suspended without pay. The workers filed grievances with their union and are taking part in an in-house investigation. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), a government agency designed to protect workers on the job, said people working near electric lines, including telephone workers, should refrain from wearing all types of jewelry. Unfortunately, Ameritech's current policy only attacks non-traditional facial piercings, and not ear piercings or other jewelry. The suspended linemen have stated that they would return to work if the policy applied to all jewelry and to all employees, a change that would follow the OSHA rules to the letter.

http://www.salary.com/advice/layouthtmls/advl_display_nocat_Ser64_Par140.html

February 2006: They come just days before the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is to announce its new standard for workplace exposure to hexavalent chromium -- a known carcinogen handled by 380,000 U.S. workers in the steel, aerospace, electroplating and other industries.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/23/AR2006022301783.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Owned by (partial or full, past or present) Department of Labor/Labor Department (DOL) Organization May 16, 2005
Possible/Unclear National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health (NACOSH) Organization Jan 26, 2012
Organization Executive (past or present) Ross Eisenbrey J.D. Person Sep 28, 2007
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Edwin G. Foulke Jr., Esq. Person Apr 27, 2007
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) John L. Henshaw Person Jan 7, 2009
Research/Analysis Subject Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Prof. David M. Michaels Ph.D., MPH Person May 28, 2010

Articles and Resources

29 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 9]

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Feb 22, 2011 Workers Sickened at Apple Supplier in China

QUOTE: 137 workers at a factory here had been seriously injured by a toxic chemical used in making the signature slick glass screens of the iPhone... But in interviews last weekend, nearly a dozen employees who say they were harmed by the chemical said they had never heard from anyone at Apple.

New York Times
May 27, 2010 Safety Rules Can’t Keep Up With Biotech Industry

QUOTE: the estimated 232,000 employees in the nation’s most sophisticated biotechnology labs work amid imponderable hazards. And some critics say the modern biolab often has fewer federal safety regulations than a typical blue-collar factory.

New York Times
May 08, 2010 For BP, a History of Spills and Safety Lapses

QUOTE: After BP’s Texas City, Tex., refinery blew up in 2005...The next year, when a badly maintained oil pipeline ruptured and spilled 200,000 gallons of crude oil over Alaska’s North Slope...Despite those repeated promises to reform, BP continues to lag other oil companies when it comes to safety...

New York Times
Nov 16, 2009 Work-Related Injuries Underreported

QUOTE: Employers and workers routinely underreport work-related injuries and illnesses, calling into question the accuracy of nationwide data that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration compiles each year, the Government Accountability Office said Monday.

New York Times
Oct 02, 2009 Dark and Bitter: Food workers increasingly exist in a legal limbo with no protections for wages, benefits, job security, or life and limb. Why are employers like Hershey off the hook?

QUOTE: In this new world, workers are paid only when needed. There are no more messy layoffs -- merely the end of an assignment. All the risks are shifted to workers. Staffing agencies often tout their services as giving employees flexibility and variety, but [Nik] Theodore's research shows they are worse off by many measures.

American Prospect
Aug 10, 2009 Scientist Tackles Ethical Questions of Space Travel: A Conversation With Paul Root Wolpe

QUOTE: NASA does hundreds of research studies. Every astronaut who goes into space is, essentially, a human research subject... One of the things I [bioethicist Paul Root Wolpe] do is look over the research protocols and make sure they are in compliance with earth-bound regulations about informed consent and health and safety.

New York Times
Aug 08, 2009 Fatal Sunshine: The Plight of California's Farm Workers

QUOTE: Last week, the ACLU and the blue-chip law firm Munger, Tolles & Olson sued California's occupational-health and safety agency... According to the lawsuit "large numbers of agricultural employers fail utterly to provide basic access to water and shade for their employees" and, as a result, hundreds suffer heat-related illnesses and hospitalizations — or worse — each year .

Time Magazine
Aug 04, 2009 More than half of ER nurses have been assaulted on job

QUOTE: More than half of nurses who work in emergency departments report they've been physically assaulted on the job...

USA TODAY
Dec 29, 2008 Under Bush, OSHA Mired in Inaction

QUOTE: Current and former career officials at OSHA say that such sagas were a recurrent feature during the Bush administration, as political appointees ordered the withdrawal of dozens of workplace health regulations, slow-rolled others, and altered the reach of its warnings and rules in response to industry pressure.

Washington Post
Jul 08, 2008 Princeton can keep its cops unarmed, OSHA says

QUOTE: Princeton University's policy of not allowing its officers to carry guns on campus doesn't hurt the officers' ability to do their jobs, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration ruled. OSHA closed the case on June 24 after ruling on June 20 that Princeton had complied with OSHA regulations. The complaint, filed by Public Safety Fraternal Orders of Police's president and patrolman James Lanzi, alleged that the policy of not allowing Public Safety officers to carry guns was an occupational hazard.

CNN (Cable News Network)
May 07, 2007 Flavoring Suspected in Illness: Calif. Considers Banning Chemical Used in Microwave Popcorn

QUOTE: Since 2001, academic studies have shown links between the disease and a chemical used in artificial butter flavor called diacetyl. One death from the disease has been confirmed. But no federal laws regulate the chemical's use.

Washington Post
Apr 25, 2007 OSHA Leaves Worker Safety in Hands of Industry

QUOTE: ...OSHA’s practices under the Bush administration, which vowed to limit new rules and roll back what it considered cumbersome regulations that imposed unnecessary costs on businesses and consumers. Across Washington, political appointees — often former officials of the industries they now oversee — have eased regulations or weakened enforcement of rules on issues like driving hours for truckers, logging in forests and corporate mergers.

New York Times
Feb 17, 2007 The future of heat-beaming weapons.

QUOTE: That's the metaphysical gap nonlethal energy weapons exploit. The rain of pain falls mainly in the brain. The long-range acoustic device, for instance, "can target narrow sound beams at excruciating decibel levels, but below the threshold of hearing damage," according to a military account of a presentation by its project manager. Four months ago, Congress passed and President Bush signed legislation to prosecute torture, defined as intentional infliction of "serious physical or mental pain or suffering." But that rule applies only in captivity. On the street, pain administration won't be a crime. It'll be a policy.

Slate
Apr 26, 2006 OSHA Comes Up Short on Workplace, Safety-Program Evaluations, Report Shows

QUOTE: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration does not perform many safety inspections at federal workplaces and has not conducted any agency-wide evaluations of federal safety programs in the last six years...OSHA has not turned in a report on federal agency safety programs to the president since fiscal 2000, even though OSHA is required by a White House directive and regulations to review the programs each year...

Washington Post
Apr 26, 2006 BP Fined Over Safety Issues at Ohio Refinery

QUOTE: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration compared violations at the plant with those at BP's Texas City, Tex., refinery, where 15 workers died and more than 170 were injured in a major explosion in last year. The Texas refinery had been fined for safety violations twice the year before the explosion.

Washington Post
Apr 08, 2006 Nanotech Raises Worker-Safety Questions

QUOTE: No state or federal worker-protection rules address the specific risks of nanomaterials, even though many laboratory and animal studies have shown that nano-size particles -- those on the order of a millionth of a millimeter -- spur peculiar biological reactions and can be far more toxic than larger granules of the same chemicals.

Washington Post
Feb 24, 2006 Chromium Evidence Buried, Report Says: Authors Fault Industry Researchers

QUOTE: Scientists working for the chromium industry withheld data about the metal's health risks while the industry campaigned to block strict new limits on the cancer-causing chemical...

Washington Post
Dec 20, 2005 Finding a Way to Better Guidance

QUOTE: ...accepted practice in which many agencies issue policy statements and other documents as "guidance" to interpret their rules and set out expectations for compliance. Unlike traditional rulemaking, guidance is not subject to notice and comment procedures or judicial review. It's faster to issue and, normally, not reviewed by the OIRA. Though not legally binding, guidance is sometimes considered practically binding by regulated industries, a sort of "backdoor" rulemaking.

Washington Post
Nov 02, 2005 Toxic Recycling

QUOTE: Inside this maximum-security prison, inmates smash computer monitors with hammers, releasing dust that contains lead, cadmium, barium and other toxic substances...under conditions that pose serious hazards to prison staff and inmates--and, ultimately, to the rest of America and the world.

Nation
Feb 01, 2005 OSHA Slow to Act on Beryllium Exposure, Critic Says

QUOTE: For several years, Adam M. Finkel, a top administrator at the Labor Department's Occupational Safety and Health Administration, said he expected the agency to test its inspectors for exposure to beryllium fumes or dust. In 2002, he realized the agency was not moving in that direction, and he became a whistle-blower.

Washington Post

29 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 9]