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Rear Admiral John D. Hutson


Self Description

October 2007: "B.A., Michigan State University
J.D., Minnesota Law School
LL.M., Georgetown Univerity Law Center

Dean Hutson was born in North Muskegon, Michigan. He was commissioned in the U.S. Navy upon graduation from Michigan State University in 1969. He graduated from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1972. Upon admission to the State Bar of Michigan, he attended the Naval Justice School in Newport, R.I. In 1973, he was assigned to the Law Center in Corpus Christi, TX, where he served as Chief Defense Counsel and Chief Trial Counsel. In 1975, he was transferred to Naval Air Station, Point Mugu, CA. He served as the Station legal officer for two years before returning to Newport to serve as an instructor at the Naval Justice School, where he taught Civil Law, Procedure, and Evidence.

In 1980, Dean Hutson attended Georgetown University Law Center where he earned a Master of Laws degree in labor law. He was then assigned as a legislative counsel in the first of three tours in the Office of Legislative Affairs for the Navy. In 1984, he was assigned to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery, ME, where he served both as Staff Judge Advocate and Administrative Officer.

Dean Hutson assumed duty as Executive Officer of the Naval Legal Service Office, Newport, RI, in 1987. In 1989, he returned to Washington, DC, to serve as Staff Judge Advocate and Executive Assistant to the Commander, Naval Investigative Command.

In August, 1989, Dean Hutson moved to the Office of Legislative Affairs as Director of Legislation. Between October, 1992, and November, 1993, he was assigned as the Executive Assistant to the Judge Advocate General of the Navy. In November, 1993, he resumed duty in the Office of Legislative Affairs.

In August, 1994, he assumed duty as Commanding Officer, Naval Legal Service Office, Europe and Southwest Asia, located in Naples, Italy. In July, 1996, Dean Hutson returned to the Naval Justice School as Commanding Officer. He was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral, and assumed duties as the Judge Advocate General of the Navy in May, 1997. He also served as the DOD/JCS Representative for Ocean Policy.

Dean Hutson was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit (with three gold stars), Meritorious Service Medal (with two gold stars), Navy Commendation Medal, and Navy Achievement Medal.

Dean Hutson is married to the former Paula Smith of Fairview Park, OH. They have two daughters, Christy and Melissa."

http://www.piercelaw.edu/deansoffice/hutson.htm

Third-Party Descriptions

October 2007: '"The unfortunate reality is that once you've done it, once you immunize interrogators or phone companies, then it's easy to do it again in another context," Hutson said. "It seems to me that as a general rule, retroactive immunity is not a good thing. . . . It's essentially letting Congress handle something that should be handled by the judiciary."'

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/10/21/AR2007102101041.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Organization Executive (past or present) Department of the Navy Organization Oct 22, 2007
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Franklin Pierce Law Center Organization Oct 22, 2007
Student/Trainee (past or present) Georgetown University Organization Oct 22, 2007
Student/Trainee (past or present) Michigan State University (MSU) Organization Oct 22, 2007
Student/Trainee (past or present) University of Minnesota Organization Oct 22, 2007

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Oct 22, 2007 Immunity for Telecoms May Set Bad Precedent, Legal Scholars Say: Retroactive Protection Could Create Problems in the Future

QUOTE: The proposal marks the second time in recent years that Congress has moved toward providing legal immunity for past actions that may have been illegal. The Military Commissions Act, passed by a GOP-led Congress in September 2006, provided retroactive immunity for CIA interrogators who could have been accused of war crimes for mistreating detainees.

Washington Post