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Recording Industry Association of America, The (RIAA)


Self Description

August 2007: "The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) is the trade group that represents the U.S. recording industry. Its mission is to foster a business and legal climate that supports and promotes our members' creative and financial vitality. Its members are the record companies that comprise the most vibrant national music industry in the world. RIAA members create, manufacture and/or distribute approximately 90% of all legitimate sound recordings produced and sold in the United States.

In support of this mission, the RIAA works to protect intellectual property rights worldwide and the First Amendment rights of artists; conducts consumer, industry and technical research; and monitors and reviews state and federal laws, regulations and policies. The RIAA® also certifies Gold®, Platinum®, Multi-Platinum™, and Diamond sales awards, as well as Los Premios De Oro y Platino™, an award celebrating Latin music sales."

http://www.riaa.com/aboutus.php

October 2001: "...the trade group that represents the U.S. recording industry. Our mission is to foster a business and legal climate that supports and promotes our members' creative and financial vitality." http://www.riaa.org/About-Who.cfm

Third-Party Descriptions

August 2012: 'This is a new development for anti-piracy efforts. Organizations like the MPAA, RIAA, IFPA, and FACT have long lobbied law enforcement officials to prosecute "rogue sites" and have provided them with information and logistical support to do so. But public prosecutors generally have the final say on who will be indicted. In the Vickerman case, the public prosecutors concluded that there wasn't enough evidence to merit prosecution. FACT disagreed and invoked what one lawyer told us is an "archaic right" for a private organization to bring criminal prosecutions against other private parties.'

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2012/08/private-justice-how-hollywood-money-put-a-brit-behind-bars/

December 2011: 'The Dajaz1 case became particularly interesting to us, after we saw evidence showing that the songs that ICE used in its affidavit as "evidence" of criminal copyright infringement were songs sent by representatives of the copyright holder with the request that the site publicize the works -- in one case, even coming from a VP at a major music label. Even worse, about the only evidence that ICE had that these songs were infringing was the word of the "VP of Anti-Piracy Legal Affairs for the RIAA," Carlos Linares, who was simply not in a position to know if the songs were infringing or authorized. In fact, one of the songs involved an artist not even represented by an RIAA label, and Linares clearly had absolutely no right to speak on behalf of that artist.'

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20111208/08225217010/breaking-news-feds-falsely-censor-popular-blog-over-year-deny-all-due-process-hide-all-details.shtml

August 2011: 'As a result the major record labels — Universal, Sony, EMI and Warner — are now fighting the efforts of recording artists and songwriters to invoke those rights. The Recording Industry Association of America, which represents the interests of the labels, maintains that most sound recordings are not eligible for termination rights because they are “works for hire,” collective works or compilations created not by independent performers but by musicians who are, in essence, employees of the labels.'

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/29/arts/music/representative-john-conyers-wants-copyright-law-revision.html

July 2011: "In bringing together the media companies and Internet carriers, the deal demonstrates how the once-clear line separating those two businesses has been blurred. Eight years ago, the Recording Industry Association of America had to sue Verizon to try to uncover the identity of a customer who was sharing music online. This year, Comcast completed its merger with NBC, bringing an owner of digital content and a conduit for it under the same roof."

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/08/technology/to-slow-piracy-internet-providers-ready-penalties.html

October 2010: 'In a statement Tuesday, the Recording Industry Association of America, the music industry’s trade group that had managed the suit, said: “For the better part of the last decade, LimeWire and Gorton have violated the law. The court has now signed an injunction that will start to unwind the massive piracy machine that LimeWire and Gorton used to enrich themselves immensely.”'

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/27/technology/27limewire.html

August 2009: "The Performance Rights Act, introduced in both the House and Senate, aims to force radio stations to start paying artists for the music they play on the air. Needless to say, the RIAA and record labels are pushing hard for the bill's passage, but big broadcasters like Clear Channel aren't quite so fond of it. The National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), for example, has launched a public advertising campaign against the bill, arguing that the additional royalties could destroy commercial radio."

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2009/08/senate-hears-royalty-debate-pitting-big-content-vs-big-radio.ars

June 2009: "(Computerworld) The massive $1.9 million fine imposed by a federal jury yesterday in the retrial of a Minnesota woman accused of pirating 24 songs may could end up hurting the Recording Industry Association of America's anti-piracy campaign more than anything else, a leading copyright lawyer said."

http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9134582

October 2008: 'The Recording Industry Association of America is labeling a Texas woman "vexatious" for her refusal to pay the record labels $7,400 for allegedly infringing 37 songs on the Kazaa file sharing network.'

http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/10/riaa-decries-te.html

March 2008: 'This issue, of course, flutters close to the heart of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and MPAA, parties which have filed early and often in the FCC's proceeding on the matter. The MPAA's February 28 statement asserts that "ISPs must be able to use network management techniques to address the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted content taking place over their networks, for the benefit of legitimate consumers and subscribers." The powerful movie studio lobby filed the comment over a week before taking a public stand against net neutrality at the Showest convention in Las Vegas. There, MPAA boss Dan Glickman declared that government regulation of the Internet "would impair the ability of broadband providers to address the serious and rampant piracy problems occurring over their networks today."'

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080320-fcc-commish-net-neutrality-shouldnt-extend-to-illegal-acts.html

February 2008: '[a judge] denied granting a default judgment, writing that the record labels failed to show Brennan was actually distributing copies of songs, which he said is what is against the law...."That seems to be a very significant blow to the RIAA's [Recording Industry Association of America] template litigation strategy," she wrote.'

http://www.infoworld.com/article/08/02/26/US-judge-pokes-hole-in-file-sharing-lawsuit_1.html

January 2008: "The court reiterated language from a 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision last year, a decision often cited by the Recording Industry Association of America in its music downloading lawsuits against Kazaa file sharers."

http://www.wired.com/politics/law/news/2008/01/kid_porn

December 2007: "Represented by the state’s attorney general, Hardy Myers, the university filed a blistering motion to quash the subpoena, accusing the industry of misleading the judge, violating student privacy laws and engaging in questionable investigative practices. Cary Sherman, the president of the Recording Industry Association of America, said the industry had seen “a lot of crazy stuff” filed in response to its lawsuits and subpoenas. “But coming from the office of an attorney general of a state?” Mr. Sherman asked, incredulous. “We found it really surprising and disappointing.”"

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/31/us/31bar.html

August 2007: The fact that the record labels act together to advance their litigation agenda is unquestioned. At this point, the record labels have filed over 25,000 lawsuits, and since some very early setbacks, they have gone about them in the exact same manner. From the use of Media Sentry as its investigative arm and subsequent John Doe lawsuits to the boilerplate complaints with identical wording, the one thing that the RIAA has demonstrated is a stunning uniformity in its approach to file-sharing cases.

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20070830-riaa-denies-copyright-misuse-in-the-wake-of-antitrust-monopoly-accusations.html

June 2007: As universities are pressured to punish students and install expensive 'filtering' technologies to monitor their computer networks, the entertainment industry has ramped up its student shakedown campaign. The Recording Industry Association of America has targeted more than 1,600 individual students in the past four months, demanding that each pay $3,000 for file-sharing transgressions or face a federal lawsuit. In total, the music and movie industries have brought more than 20,000 federal lawsuits against individual Americans in the past three years.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/06/05/AR2007060501761.html

April 2007: But the Recording Industry Assn. of America and the Motion Picture Assn. of America say they sometimes need to use subterfuge as they pursue bootleggers in flea markets and on the Internet.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-pretext7apr07,1,1936238.story

May 2006: Yesterday, however, a coalition of record labels alleged that XM's Inno device amounts to a 'new digital download subscription service' not covered by existing agreements.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/05/16/AR2006051601826.html

October 2005: The turnaround is the result of a June Supreme Court ruling that sites such as eDonkey, Kazaa and Grokster are endorsing theft of digital content, such as songs and movies. Emboldened, the Recording Industry Association of America sent out cease-and-desist orders to many P2P sites earlier this month.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/30/AR2005093001681.html

January 2005: Mitch Bainwol, head of the Recording Industry Association of America, said his industry merely wants to strike a balance. "We need to put in our equation the innovation of creative works from artists, not just the innovation of the devices," he said.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A31332-2005Jan23.html

November 2004: The suits are the first major act of Glickman's new tenure and mark a fundamental split in philosophy from his predecessor Jack Valenti, who found filing suits against potential customers, as the Recording Industry Association of America has done, distasteful. Some studios shared the sentiment and were worried what the suits would do to their image, studio sources said. In the end, though, all signed on.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A25784-2004Nov4.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Member of (past or present) Center for Copyright Information (CCI) Organization Mar 3, 2013
Opponent (past or present) LimeWire Organization Oct 27, 2010
Member of (past or present) Media Coalition Organization Apr 20, 2010
Cooperation (past or present) MediaSentry Organization Jan 14, 2008
Opponent (past or present) Scour Organization Oct 18, 2006
Opponent (past or present) University of Oregon (UO) Organization Jan 14, 2008
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Mitch Bainwol Person Sep 7, 2004
Opponent (past or present) Mark Gorton Person Oct 27, 2010
Representative to (past or present) Marc Racicot Esq. Person Sep 4, 2006
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Cary H. Sherman Esq. Person Jan 14, 2008

Articles and Resources

70 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 20]   [End]

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Aug 16, 2012 Private justice: How Hollywood money put a Brit behind bars: Industry-funded prosecution leads to 4-year sentence for SurfTheChannel owner.

QUOTE: Organizations like the MPAA, RIAA, IFPA, and FACT have long lobbied law enforcement officials to prosecute "rogue sites" and have provided them with information and logistical support to do so. But public prosecutors generally have the final say on who will be indicted. In the Vickerman case, the public prosecutors concluded that there wasn't enough evidence to merit prosecution. FACT disagreed and invoked what one lawyer told us is an "archaic right" for a private organization to bring criminal prosecutions against other private parties.

Ars Technica
Dec 08, 2011 Breaking News: Feds Falsely Censor Popular Blog For Over A Year, Deny All Due Process, Hide All Details...

QUOTE: The US government has effectively admitted that it totally screwed up and falsely seized & censored a non-infringing domain of a popular blog, having falsely claimed that it was taking part in criminal copyright infringement. Then, after trying to hide behind a totally secretive court process with absolutely no due process whatsoever...

Techdirt
Aug 28, 2011 Legislator Calls for Clarifying Copyright Law

QUOTE: When copyright law was revised in 1976, recording artists and songwriters were granted “termination rights,” which enable them to regain control of their work after 35 years. But with musicians and songwriters now moving to assert that control, the provision threatens to leave the four major record companies, which have made billions of dollars from such recordings and songs, out in the cold. As a result the major record labels — Universal, Sony, EMI and Warner — are now fighting the efforts of recording artists and songwriters to invoke those rights.

New York Times
Jul 07, 2011 To Slow Piracy, Internet Providers Ready Penalties

QUOTE: After years of negotiations with Hollywood and the music industry, the nation’s top Internet providers have agreed to a systematic approach to identifying customers suspected of digital copyright infringement and then alerting them via e-mail or other means....concerns that consumers might be punished “based on allegations that have not been tested in court.”

New York Times
Dec 19, 2010 Music Web Sites Dispute Legality of Their Closing

QUOTE: federal authorities shut down five Web sites last month on suspicion of copyright infringement, they gave no warning and offered no details of their investigation... the operators of several of the sites said in interviews that they were innocent of infringement, and criticized the investigation for misrepresenting how their sites worked.

New York Times
Oct 26, 2010 Judge Tells LimeWire, the File-Trading Service, to Disable Its Software

QUOTE: injunction on Tuesday that will essentially shut down LimeWire, the big music file-sharing service that has been mired in a four-year legal struggle with the music industry. The case has already resulted in the company and its founder being found liable for potentially hundreds of millions of dollars in damages.

New York Times
Jun 02, 2010 The RIAA? Amateurs. Here's how you sue 14,000+ P2P users

QUOTE: why have P2P lawsuits against individuals spiked dramatically in 2010? It's all thanks to the US Copyright Group, a set of lawyers who have turned P2P prosecution into revenue generation in order to "SAVE CINEMA."

Ars Technica
Oct 03, 2009 Will Books Be Napsterized? (Digital Domain)

QUOTE: With the new devices [electronic readers] in hand, will book buyers avert their eyes from the free copies only a few clicks away that have been uploaded without the copyright holder’s permission?

New York Times
Aug 11, 2009 Can I make copies of my DVDs? One reader wants to know how to replace his damaged DVD movies and music CDs (Gripe Line)

QUOTE: let's start with the loaded part of the question: "We all know that it's illegal to make copies of CDs and DVDs." I don't think we do know that. In fact, I [Christina Wood] think there is a lot of confusion about this.

InfoWorld
Aug 05, 2009 Senate hears royalty debate pitting Big Content vs Big Radio

QUOTE: Radio stations pay only songwriters for the music they play, while recording artists get nothing (except publicity). When music is delivered via webcasting, cable networks, and satellite radio, however, station owners need to pay both songwriters and recording artists.

Ars Technica
Jun 22, 2009 Will File-Sharing Case Spawn a Copyright Reform Movement?

QUOTE: There’s no doubt that a multi-million dollar judgment [in the Jammie Thomas-Rasset copyright case] over $24 worth of music provides the clearest example yet of the abuses made possible by the 1976 Copyright Act...

Wired
Jun 19, 2009 Analysis: $1.92M fine in music piracy case could hurt RIAA: Retrial of Jammie Thomas-Rasset ends with massive fine imposed on her

QUOTE: The massive $1.9 million fine imposed by a federal jury yesterday in the retrial of a Minnesota woman [Jammie Thomas-Rasset] accused of pirating 24 songs may could end up hurting the Recording Industry Association of America's anti-piracy campaign... That's because the sheer size of the verdict hammers home just how unreasonable the RIAA's damages theory for copyright infringement is...

Computerworld
Mar 27, 2009 Threat Level Privacy, Crime and Security Online MPAA Negotiates With ISPs to Disconnect or Penalize Copyright Offenders

QUOTE: Hollywood studios are negotiating with broadband providers to take action against customers caught downloading movies repeatedly.

Wired
Oct 17, 2008 RIAA Decries Texas Woman as 'Vexatious' for Demanding File Sharing Trial

QUOTE: The Recording Industry Association of America is labeling a Texas woman "vexatious" for her refusal to pay the record labels $7,400 for allegedly infringing 37 songs on the Kazaa file sharing network.

Wired
Jul 01, 2008 Textbook Piracy Grows Online, Prompting a Counterattack From Publishers

QUOTE: In response to such sites, the Association of American Publishers hired an outside law firm this summer to scour the Web for illegally offered textbooks. Already the firm has identified thousands of instances of book piracy and has sent legal notices to Web sites hosting the files demanding that they be removed. The group is looking for all types of books, though trade books and textbooks, which generally have high price tags, are the most frequent books offered on peer-to-peer sites.

Chronicle of Higher Education
Jun 05, 2008 The Inexact Science Behind DMCA Takedown Notices (Bits)

QUOTE: The paper finds that there is a serious flaw in how these trade groups finger alleged file-sharers. It also suggests that some people might be getting improperly accused of sharing copyrighted content, and could even be purposely framed by other users.

New York Times
Mar 20, 2008 FCC commish: Net neutrality shouldn't extend to illegal acts

QUOTE: Earlier this week, FCC Commissioner Jonathan Adelstein told a symposium on Internet Video Policy that the various net neutrality proposals the agency is considering include "exemptions for illegal activities." Content Agenda's Paul Sweeting reports that Adelstein said that the Commission will be "very careful about the use of the Internet for illegal purposes, and that includes the illegal downloading of copyrighted works..." But, Sweeting adds, that doesn't mean Adelstein approves of content filtering. "The problem is, how can you ever tell what's illegal?" Adelstein asked the gathering.

Ars Technica
Feb 26, 2008 U.S. judge pokes hole in file-sharing lawsuit: Court ruling could force the music industry to provide more evidence against people accused of illegal file sharing, legal experts say

QUOTE: recent U.S. court ruling could force the music industry to provide more evidence against people accused of illegal file sharing....[the judge] denied granting a default judgment, writing that the record labels failed to show Brennan was actually distributing copies of songs, which he said is what is against the law.

InfoWorld
Jan 28, 2008 Kazaa User Appeals Feds' Novel Use of Child Porn Law to Supreme Court

QUOTE: Last year, Walter Sewell...was sentenced under the [Protect Act] to the automatic 15-year prison stretch after downloading and sharing sexually explicit images over the Kazaa file-sharing network...[Sewell's attorney] argues that sharing such files over Kazaa shouldn't qualify as advertising under the law, and therefore shouldn't be subject to the mandatory 15 years.

Wired
Dec 31, 2007 In the Fight Over Piracy, a Rare Stand for Privacy

QUOTE: ...[the University of Oregon] filed a blistering motion to quash the subpoena [asking for the identities of students believed to be pirating songs off the Internet], accusing the [record] industry of misleading the judge, violating student privacy laws and engaging in questionable investigative practices.

New York Times

70 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 20]   [End]