You are here: Fairness.com > Resources > Rafael Correa

Rafael Correa


Self Description

Third-Party Descriptions

July 2008: 'The government of President Rafael Correa has characterized the takeover of those companies, including television stations watched by about 40 percent of the news audience, as a long-overdue strike for justice against corrupt businessmen who owe Ecuador millions. It is a move consistent with the rhetoric of the "citizens revolution" declared by Correa, a former economy minister who refused to move out of his home in a middle-class neighborhood when elected president, and who aligns himself with left-leaning governments in Venezuela and Bolivia.'

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/07/18/AR2008071802952.html

July 2007: "Ecuador's new leftist president, Rafael Correa, is wasting no time forging his own path toward the "21st-century socialism" championed by Venezuela's anti-US leader, Hugo Chávez....three months after taking office on promises to wrest control of the country from the hands of a corrupt elite, Mr. Correa kicked out the representative to the World Bank. He blames the financial institution for forced privatization programs that have failed to benefit the poor, he says."

http://www.csmonitor.com/2007/0706/p04s01-woam.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Opponent (past or present) World Bank Group Organization Jul 31, 2007

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
May 29, 2009 Chevron fights massive lawsuit in Ecuador

QUOTE: The landmark lawsuit, which began in 1993 in New York and is now in an Ecuadorean court in this jungle region, alleges that Texaco, which was acquired by Chevron in 2001, knowingly unleashed toxins across an estimated 1,700 square miles – roughly the size of Rhode Island.

Christian Science Monitor
Jul 19, 2008 Takeovers Captivate Ecuador: Government Links Its Seizure of TV Stations to Corruption Case

QUOTE: The government of President Rafael Correa has characterized the takeover of those companies, including television stations watched by about 40 percent of the news audience, as a long-overdue strike for justice against corrupt businessmen who owe Ecuador millions.

Washington Post
Jul 06, 2007 Ecuador moves to cut Interest rates for poor: Banks and microlenders say Ecuador's leftist president may hurt most those he wants to help with 'financial justice' law.

QUOTE: [Although] The bill...paves the way for a complete overhaul of an abusive financial system...[it] could hurt most those Correa hopes to help.

Christian Science Monitor