You are here: Fairness.com > Resources > Jeanne Sather

Jeanne Sather


Self Description

October 2006: "Jeanne Sather is an outspoken advocate for the cancer patient’s point of view. She has written about taking part in clinical trials, living with incurable cancer, “pink ribbon” marketing run amok, strategies for getting through cancer treatment, how to help when a friend has cancer, and much more...Jeanne coined the term “MIA doctors” to refer to doctors, in particular oncologists, who disappear when their patients are dying.

Jeanne began her career as a journalist, working for newspapers, magazines, and wire services, including Newsweek in Tokyo, Reuters in Seattle, MSN (also in Seattle), and a number of other publications.

When she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1998 at age 43, she started writing about cancer. First she wrote about her own experience, with a weekly feature on the OnHealth Web site called “Jeanne’s Diary” that chronicled the ups and downs of her first series of cancer treatments.

Then she began writing for the Web site of the cancer center where she gets her treatment. She also writes an occasional piece for other publications, including Seattle Weekly, which put her story, “Running With Fear,” on its cover in December of 2003.

Jeanne teaches nonfiction writing at the University of Washington Extension. In addition, she has created a unique writing workshop for people living with metastatic cancer.

Jeanne has two master’s degrees, one in Japanese language from the University of Hawaii, where she studied on a grant from the East-West Center, and another in journalism from the University of California at Berkeley. She has a B.A. in Communications from Michigan State University in East Lansing.

http://theacp.typepad.com/about.html

September 1996: "Jeanne Sather, a former Tokyo-based Newsweek correspondent and former Business Journal reporter, is a Seattle-based free-lance writer. She speaks fluent Japanese."

http://seattle.bizjournals.com/seattle/stories/1996/09/16/story4.html?page=4

Third-Party Descriptions

July 2005: '"For patients, having their doctor go MIA at the end of their lives is "a horrible thing to have happen," said Jeanne Sather, a cancer patient who has interviewed others for a book she's writing. "It feels like a desertion. It's very painful. They feel abandoned."'

http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/health/chi-0507240416jul24,1,3463067.story

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Founded/Co-Founded by Owned by (partial or full, past or present) Assertive Cancer Patient Source Oct 21, 2006
Student/Trainee (past or present) Michigan State University (MSU) Organization Oct 21, 2006
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) Newsweek Source Oct 21, 2006
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) University of Washington Extension Organization Oct 21, 2006
Student/Trainee (past or present) University of California - Berkeley (UC Berkeley) Organization Oct 21, 2006
Student/Trainee (past or present) University of Hawaii Organization Oct 21, 2006

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jul 24, 2005 Dying patients appreciate a doctor who says goodbye

QUOTE: For patients, having their doctor go MIA at the end of their lives is 'a horrible thing to have happen,' said Jeanne Sather, a cancer patient...

Chicago Tribune