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Lenovo Group


Self Description

February 2008: "Lenovo is an innovative, international technology company formed as a result of the acquisition by the Lenovo Group of the IBM Personal Computing Division.

As a global leader in the PC market, we develop, manufacture and market cutting-edge, reliable, high-quality PC products and value-added professional services that provide customers around the world with smarter ways to be productive and competitive.

We base our success on our customers achieving their goals: productivity in business and enhancement of personal life.

Our company

Lenovo is a global company with executive offices in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA, Beijing, China, and Singapore. Its principal operations are in Beijing, China, and Raleigh, North Carolina, USA, with an enterprise sales organization worldwide. The company employs more than 19,000 people worldwide."

http://www.lenovo.com/lenovo/us/en/

August 2006: "Lenovo is an innovative, international technology company formed as a result of the acquisition by the Lenovo Group of the IBM Personal Computing Division.

As a global leader in the PC market, we develop, manufacture and market cutting-edge, reliable, high-quality PC products and value-added professional services that provide customers around the world with smarter ways to be productive and competitive."

http://www.lenovo.com/lenovo/us/en/

Third-Party Descriptions

February 2008: "Lenovo Group Limited (SEHK: 0992) is today the fourth largest personal computer manufacturer in the world, after Hewlett-Packard and Dell of the US, and Acer of Taiwan....

The company was founded in 1984 by a group of eleven engineers, headed by Liu Chuanzhi, in Beijing. Originally known as Legend Group Ltd and New Technology Developer Incorporated, the listed holding company was incorporated in 1988 in Hong Kong. The company had become the biggest PC manufacturer of domestic and distributed third party products through its wholesale business.

The company underwent restructuring and separated into two entities. They were Lenovo and Digital China Holdings Limited. Lenovo became the personal computer manufacturer and Digital China took on the wholesale and distribution of IT products and services.

In 2005 Lenovo purchased IBM's PC Division which transformed it into a major international personal computer manufacturer. Lenovo paid $1.27 billion to IBM which consisted of $655 million in cash and $600 million in Lenovo stock. As a result of the acquisition, Lenovo gained the rights to the product lines as well as licensed trademarks such as ThinkVision, ThinkPad, ThinkVantage, ThinkCentre, Aptiva, and NetVista. As of May 1, 2005, IBM owned 19.9% of Lenovo."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenovo_Group

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Status/Name Change from IBM Corporation (International Business Machines) Organization Feb 11, 2008
Financial Supporter of (past or present) StopBadware.org Organization Aug 29, 2006

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jan 25, 2012 In China, Human Costs Are Built Into an iPad

QUOTE: workers assembling iPhones, iPads and other devices often labor in harsh conditions, according to employees inside those plants, worker advocates and documents published by companies themselves. Problems are as varied as onerous work environments and serious — sometimes deadly — safety problems....More than half of the suppliers audited by Apple have violated at least one aspect of the code of conduct every year since 2007, according to Apple’s reports, and in some instances have violated the law.

New York Times
Feb 01, 2008 Refurb Madness

ABSTRACT: A series of consumer advice articles/sidebars explaining how the Refurbished PC industry works and providing a wealth of tips, questions to ask, and overviews of the leading manufacturers' policies.

PC Magazine
Apr 06, 2007 Venom on the Web: Nastiness online can erupt and go global overnight, and "no comment" doesn't cut it anymore. Here's how to cope

QUOTE: Most companies are wholly unprepared to deal with the new nastiness that's erupting online. That's worrisome as the Web moves closer to being the prime advertising medium—and reputational conduit—of our time...In the beginning, the idea of this new conversation seemed so benign. Radical transparency: the new public-relations nirvana! Companies, employees, and customers engage in a Webified dialectic. Executives gain insight into product development, consumer needs, and strategic opportunities. All the back-and-forth empowers consumers, who previously were relegated to shouting at call-center minions. Venom can be a great leading indicator.

BusinessWeek