You are here: Fairness.com > Resources > David Lisak

David Lisak


Self Description

June 2014: "David Lisak is a clinical psychologist who has devoted his professional life to studying the causes and consequences of interpersonal violence. His research on nonstranger rapists, and on the long term impact of childhood sexual abuse in adult men has been published in leading scientific journals.

For the past 25 years he has served as a forensic consultant, professional trainer, and public speaker across the United States. He has served on the faculty of the National Judicial Education Project and the American Prosecutors Research Institute, and has served as a consultant to judicial, prosecutor and law enforcement education programs across the country.

He has conducted trainings and workshops in all fifty states across the U.S., and consults widely with universities, the four services of the U.S. Military, the Department of Defense, and other institutions regarding sexual assault prevention and policies. Dr. Lisak consults frequently on sexual violence and homicide cases across the country. He serves as an expert witness in death penalty cases where issues of child abuse are pertinent, and in sexual assault cases on issues of victim behavior and offender characteristics.

Himself a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, he is a founding board member of 1in6, a national, non-profit organization devoted to helping men who were sexually abused as children."

http://www.davidlisak.com/biography/

Third-Party Descriptions

November 2014: "Once successfully inside the frat house, women play the role of grateful guests in unfamiliar territory where men control the variables. In dark, loud basements, girls accept drinks, are pulled onto dance floors to be ground and groped and, later, often having lost sight of their friends, led into bathrooms or up the stairs for privacy. Most of that hooking up is consensual. But against that backdrop, as psychologist David Lisak discovered, lurk undetected predators. Lisak's 2002 groundbreaking study of more than 1,800 college men found that roughly nine out of 10 rapes are committed by serial offenders, who are responsible for an astonishing average of six rapes each. None of the offenders in Lisak's study had ever been reported. Lisak's findings upended general presumptions about campus sexual assault: It implied that most incidents are not bumbling, he-said-she-said miscommunications, but rather deliberate crimes by serial sex offenders."

http://www.rollingstone.com/culture/features/a-rape-on-campus-20141119

May 2014: '"That's what we're forced into, and it's absurd," says David Lisak, a psychologist at the University of Massachusetts at Boston who specializes in the forensics of non-stranger rape. "It wouldn't be happening if we didn't have a 1,000-year system of failure dealing with sexual assault."'

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-glaser-college-sexual-assault-20140523-story.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) University of Massachusetts Boston Organization Jun 1, 2014

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Nov 19, 2014 A Rape on Campus: A Brutal Assault and Struggle for Justice at UVA

QUOTE: UVA's emphasis on honor is so pronounced that since 1998, 183 people have been expelled for honor-code violations such as cheating on exams. And yet paradoxically, not a single student at UVA has ever been expelled for sexual assault. "Think about it," says Susan Russell, whose UVA daughter's sexual-assault report helped trigger a previous federal investigation. "In what world do you get kicked out for cheating, but if you rape someone, you can stay?"

Rolling Stone
May 22, 2014 Why colleges fail at investigating and punishing sex crimes (Op-Ed)

QUOTE: the demise of in loco parentis left colleges in an uncertain and awkward position. If they now had little or no control over student conduct, what role should they play — if any — when students misbehaved? And what if students acted in ways that would be criminal in broader society?...The disciplinary systems of colleges, designed to deal with plagiarism and roommate spats, have proved utterly inadequate to deal with the more serious issue of sexual assault.

Los Angeles Times