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Prof. Paul Oyer Ph.D.


Self Description

June 2014: "Paul Oyer is The Fred H. Merrill Professor of Economics at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. He is also a Research Associate with the National Bureau of Economics and the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Labor Economics.

Paul does research in the field of personnel economics. He has done several studies of how firms pay and provide incentives for their workers. He looked at how salespeople and executives react to incentive systems and why some firms use broad-based stock option programs. He has also done work on how firms have adjusted their human resource practices to increases in legal barriers to dismissing workers. Paul has recently studied how random events early in a person’s career can have long-term ramifications. This work focuses on MBAs (especially investment bankers) and on PhD economists. Paul’s current projects include papers focusing on how firms select and recruit workers, including new MBAs and lawyers.

Before moving to the GSB in 2000, Paul was on the faculty of the Kellogg School at Northwestern University. In his pre-academic life, he worked for the management consulting firm of Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, as well as for the high technology firms 3Com Corporation and ASK Computer Systems. He holds a BA in math and computer science from Middlebury College, an MBA from Yale University, and an MA and PhD in economics from Princeton University. When not teaching or doing research, Paul tries to keep up with his two teenage children. He runs, swims, skis, plays a mean game of ping-pong, and keeps tabs on the Oakland A’s."

http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/users/pauloyer

Third-Party Descriptions

May 2014: 'Nowhere are the middleman’s limitations more evident than dating websites. Consider, for instance, that they don’t even do the thing we perhaps most want them to do: vet potential matches for truthfulness. As a result, you almost have to assume that the lovelorn are lying about their height, weight and income; the entire online dating market, despite its immense popularity, is a giant buyer-beware zone. Some dating sites have tried to address this, writes Paul Oyer, the author of “Everything I Ever Needed to Know About Economics I Learned From Online Dating,” including a Korean site that checks national registration forms, diplomas and proof of employment. Oyer suggests that more and more companies will compete in this heavily vetted space. But it’s difficult to see that type of scrutiny — in which our profiles are written by some third parties in white coats, after a weigh-in and a background check — going over in the United States, where privacy concerns are paramount. In the meantime, that buyer-beware zone is likely to continue.'

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/01/magazine/who-wants-free-love-anyway.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Kellogg School of Management Organization Jun 1, 2014
Student/Trainee (past or present) Middlebury College Organization Jun 1, 2014
Student/Trainee (past or present) Princeton University Organization Jun 1, 2014
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Stanford University Organization Jun 1, 2014
Student/Trainee (past or present) Yale University Organization Jun 1, 2014

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
May 27, 2014 Who Wants Free Love Anyway?

QUOTE: Nowhere are the middleman’s limitations more evident than dating websites. Consider, for instance, that they don’t even do the thing we perhaps most want them to do: vet potential matches for truthfulness.

New York Times