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Prof. Emily Bell


Self Description

Third-Party Descriptions

July 2016: 'Facebook, which launched only in 2004, now has 1.6bn users worldwide. It has become the dominant way for people to find news on the internet – and in fact it is dominant in ways that would have been impossible to imagine in the newspaper era. As Emily Bell has written: “Social media hasn’t just swallowed journalism, it has swallowed everything. It has swallowed political campaigns, banking systems, personal histories, the leisure industry, retail, even government and security.”'

https://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/jul/12/how-technology-disrupted-the-truth

April 2013: 'People are less tolerant when mistakes aren’t acknowledged or the on-air speculation veers into ethnic or racial stereotypes, as the discussion of “dark-skinned” or alleged Muslim suspects did this week, says Emily Bell, a journalism professor at Columbia University.'

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/mistakes-in-news-reporting-happen-but-do-they-matter/2013/04/19/c89fbf6a-a926-11e2-a8e2-5b98cb59187f_story.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) Columbia University Organization May 2, 2013
Employee/Freelancer/Contractor (past or present) Guardian Unlimited Source May 2, 2013

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jul 12, 2016 How technology disrupted the truth

QUOTE: Social media has swallowed the news – threatening the funding of public-interest reporting and ushering in an era when everyone has their own facts. But the consequences go far beyond journalism....It seemed that journalists were no longer required to believe their own stories to be true, nor, apparently, did they need to provide evidence. Instead it was up to the reader – who does not even know the identity of the source – to make up their own mind. But based on what? Gut instinct, intuition, mood? Does the truth matter any more?

Guardian Unlimited
Apr 19, 2013 Mistakes in news reporting happen, but do they matter?

QUOTE: reporting mistakes may not be as consequential as they used to be, media observers say. Although errors can travel faster than ever in a wired age, corrections and accurate information flow faster, too...

Washington Post