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Gov. Mark Dayton


Self Description

July 2011: "Mark Dayton is Minnesota's 40th Governor. He was born in Minneapolis and raised in a house in Long Lake, where his father still lives today. He has two grown sons, Eric (29) and Andrew (26), and lives in St. Paul with his two German Shepherds, Mesabi and Wanamingo (Mingo).

Mark attended Long Lake Elementary School and Blake School in Hopkins. He loved hockey, and it was his childhood dream to be the starting goalie on the U.S. Olympic Hockey Team! He didn’t make it, but he was named an All-State goalie his senior year in high school. He graduated, cum laude, from Yale University, where he also played Division I hockey.

After college, Mark taught 9th grade general science for two years in a New York City public school. He still tells how it was the toughest job he ever had! It was here where he realized the terrible injustice that his students had so little, while he had been given so much; and he decided that he would devote his life to improving social equality and economic opportunity for all Americans.

For most of the past 34 years, Mark has served Minnesotans, as Commissioner of the Minnesota Departments of Economic Development and of Energy and Economic Development, as State Auditor, and as United States Senator. He has worked throughout our state to help businesses locate or expand and create jobs, to improve local government services, to better fund our public schools, to support our servicemen and women, to help Minnesotans get the health care they need, and in many other ways to make a better Minnesota. Currently, Mark serves on the Executive Committee of the National Governor's Association."

http://mn.gov/governor/dayton/

Third-Party Descriptions

July 2016: 'Even the white governor of Minnesota, Mark Dayton, in a pained public concession, embraced the movement’s central argument. “Would this have happened if those passengers — the driver and the passengers — were white?” he asked. “I don’t think it would’ve.”'

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/07/10/us/black-lives-matter-reaction.html

July 2011: 'Mr. Pawlenty pushed back aggressively on the suggestion that he bore any responsibility for the current crisis, in which his Democratic successor, Gov. Mark Dayton, is deadlocked with Republican majorities in the Legislature. “Everybody is responsible for the budgets on their watch,” Mr. Pawlenty said in an interview. “I’ve been gone for six months, and the last budget on my watch is in the black.”'

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/14/us/politics/14pawlenty.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Member of (past or present) Democratic Party / Democratic National Committee (DNC) Organization Jul 14, 2011
Organization Head/Leader (past or present) Minnesota (State Government) Organization Jul 14, 2011
Student/Trainee (past or present) Yale University Organization Jul 14, 2011
Subordinate of (past or present) Vice-President Walter "Fritz" Frederick Mondale Person Jul 14, 2011
Successor to Governor Tim Pawlenty Esq. Person Jul 14, 2011

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jul 09, 2016 Black Lives Matter Was Gaining Ground. Then a Sniper Opened Fire.

QUOTE: Inside Black Lives Matter, the national revulsion over videos of police officers shooting to death black men in Minnesota and Louisiana was undeniable proof that the group’s message of outrage and demands for justice had finally broken through....Black Lives Matter now faces perhaps the biggest crisis in its short history: It is both scrambling to distance itself from an African-American sniper in Dallas who set out to murder white police officers and trying to rebut a chorus of detractors who blame the movement for inspiring his deadly attack.

New York Times
Jul 13, 2011 Amid Minnesota Crisis, Pawlenty Faces Scrutiny

QUOTE: ...Mr. Pawlenty’s fiscal record as governor is drawing closer scrutiny. And while Mr. Pawlenty did face economic and political challenges in balancing the state’s budget each year, his record includes what critics say was an overreliance on one-time accounting maneuvers that failed to address the underlying problems.

New York Times