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Dr. Sarah F. Brosnan


Self Description

December 2015: "Sarah Brosnan studies the mechanisms underlying cooperation, reciprocity, inequity, and other economic decisions in nonhuman primates from an evolutionary perspective. She looks at the decisions individuals make and how they make them, how their social or ecological environments affect their decisions and interactions, and under what circumstances they can alter their behaviors depending on these conditions."

http://www.sarah-brosnan.com/

Third-Party Descriptions

November 2015: "Behavioral research shows that desire for fairness is deeply held. Sarah Brosnan and her team at Georgia State University have spent years studying this in both animals and humans. In one brilliantly illustrated 2003 study, a video shows capuchin monkeys rejecting cucumber slices when they see a neighbor fed more delicious grapes—despite being perfectly happy to eat cucumber before."

http://qz.com/560432/one-concept-will-dominate-the-paris-climate-talks-and-it-has-nothing-to-do-with-the-climate/
September 2003: Animal behavior researcher studying fairness. http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/18/science/18MONK.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Emory University Organization Sep 19, 2003
Employee/Contractor/Fellow/Freelancer (past or present) Georgia State University Organization Dec 5, 2015

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Nov 26, 2015 One concept will dominate the Paris climate talks, and it has nothing to do with the climate

QUOTE: concept is “differentiation.” But we all call it fairness. Developed countries have benefitted from emitting unlimited carbon until quite recently, reaping the economic rewards. Now, countries like India want to lift millions out of poverty. Why shouldn’t they be allowed to emit as much as their predecessors on the path to prosperity?

Quartz
Sep 18, 2003 Genetic Basis to Fairness, Study Hints

QUOTE: ...suggests that the monkeys have a sense of fair treatment and respond negatively when their expectations are violated...

New York Times