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Ernest Hemingway


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May 2010: "Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American writer and journalist. During his lifetime he had seven novels, six collections of short stories, and two works of non-fiction published, with a further three novels, four collections of short stories, and three non-fiction autobiographical works published after his death. Hemingway's distinctive writing style—known as the iceberg theory—characterized by economy and understatement, had an enormous influence on 20th-century fiction, as did his apparent life of adventure and the public image he cultivated. Hemingway produced most of his work between the mid-1920s and the mid-1950s, and his career peaked in 1954 when he won the Nobel Prize in Literature. Hemingway's fiction was successful because the characters he presented exhibited authenticity that reverberated with his audience. Many of his works are classics of American literature."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Hemingway

April 2010: 'The United States remains almost free of [anti-Semitism-Ed.], and any current writer would not be tolerated for portraits like those of Hemingway’s Robert Cohn in “The Sun Also Rises”...'

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/09/books/review/Bloom-t.html

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Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Apr 29, 2010 The Jewish Question: British Anti-Semitism

QUOTE: [Anthony Julius] is a truth-teller, and authentic enough to stand against the English literary and academic establishment, which essentially opposes the right of the state of Israel to exist, while indulging in the humbuggery that its anti-Zionism is not anti-Semitism.

New York Times