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Prof. Linda M. Heywood Ph.D.


Self Description

April 2010: "Professor Linda Heywood is the author of Contested Power in Angola, editor of and contributor to Central Africans: Cultural Transformations in the American Diaspora, and co-author with John Thornton of Central Africans, Atlantic Creoles, and the Foundation of America (Cambridge University Press, July 2007), which won the Melville J. Herskovits Award for the best scholarly work on Africa published in English in 2007. Her articles on Angola and the African Diaspora have appeared in The Journal of African History, Journal of Modern African Studies, Slavery and Abolition, and the Journal of Southern African Studies. She has served as a consultant for numerous museum exhibitions, including African Voices at the Smithsonian Institution, Against Human Dignity sponsored by the Maritime Museum, and the new exhibit at Jamestown, Virginia. She was also one of the history consultants and appeared in the PBS series African American Lives (2006) and Finding Oprah’s Roots (2007)."

http://www.bu.edu/afam/faculty/linda-heywood/

Third-Party Descriptions

April 2010: "How did slaves make it to these coastal forts? The historians John Thornton and Linda Heywood of Boston University estimate that 90 percent of those shipped to the New World were enslaved by Africans and then sold to European traders. The sad truth is that without complex business partnerships between African elites and European traders and commercial agents, the slave trade to the New World would have been impossible, at least on the scale it occurred."

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/23/opinion/23gates.html

Relationships

RoleNameTypeLast Updated
Cooperation (past or present) Colleague/Co-worker of (past or present) Prof. John K. Thornton Ph.D. Person Apr 23, 2010

Articles and Resources

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Apr 23, 2010 Ending the Slavery Blame-Game

QUOTE: how to parcel out blame to those directly involved in the capture and sale of human beings for immense economic gain. While we are all familiar with the role played by the United States and the European colonial powers like Britain, France, Holland, Portugal and Spain, there is very little discussion of the role Africans themselves played.

New York Times