You are here: Fairness.com > Resources > Science & Technology > Environmental Science: General > Ecosystems/Biodiversity

Ecosystems/Biodiversity

Search only Ecosystems/Biodiversity, and everything underneath:

Articles and Resources

96 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 46]

Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jun 03, 2010 Prosecuting Crimes Against the Earth

QUOTE: Criminal prosecution cannot restore the gulf or end the suffering of the people who live along its shores. But it could ensure just punishment. And it would make it more likely that the companies involved would pay all claims for damage to the gulf coast, because the $75 million cap on liability, set by the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, does not apply in criminal cases.

New York Times
May 24, 2010 In Standoff With Environmental Officials, BP Stays With an Oil Spill Dispersant

QUOTE: While the Corexit products, made by the Nalco company of Naperville, Ill., are the time-tested old faithfuls of oil spill treatment, they were developed in the 1980s and ’90s, and critics say that less toxic and more effective products are now available....Complicating the standoff between the company and regulators, there are many methods for estimating the toxicity of chemical oil dispersants and no single standard prevails.

New York Times
May 24, 2010 Shaky Rule in Madagascar Threatens Trees

QUOTE: MAROANSETRA, Madagascar — Exploiting a political crisis, Malagasy timber barons are robbing this island nation of its sylvan heritage, illegally cutting down scarce species of rosewood trees in poorly protected national parks...

New York Times
Apr 14, 2010 U.S. Leads New Bid to Phase Out Whale Hunting

QUOTE: The compromise deal, which has generated intense controversy within the 88-nation International Whaling Commission and among antiwhaling activists, would allow the three whaling countries to continue hunting whales for the next 10 years, although in reduced numbers.

New York Times
Nov 14, 2009 Forest People May Lose Home in Kenyan Plan

QUOTE: The Kenyan government is gearing up to evict tens of thousands of settlers, illegal or not, from the Mau Forest, the Ogiek’s ancestral home and a critical water source for this entire country. The question is: Will the few thousand remaining Ogiek be given a reprieve or given the boot?

New York Times
Sep 16, 2009 Should cheetahs be reintroduced in India? (60-Second Science)

QUOTE: controversial efforts are underway to return the cheetah to India...

Scientific American
Aug 27, 2009 Conflicted Conservation: When Restoration Efforts Are Pitted against Human Rights: Saving Earth might mean trampling indigenous societies

QUOTE: Projects to reduce pollution, prevent climate change and protect biodiversity... are drawing criticism that they could drive indigenous people off their lands and destroy their livelihoods.

Scientific American
Aug 17, 2009 Clash Over Rebirth of Mt. St. Helens

QUOTE: Some say the Forest Service should manage it [Mount St. Helens] differently. “There is a certain segment of the population who would say, ‘It’s been 30 years [since Mount St. Helen's major eruption], and it’s over,’ ” said Peter Frenzen, whose job title with the Forest Service is monument scientist.

New York Times
Jul 02, 2009 Tourism tangles a fishing lifeline: Loss of sea access hits the Dominican Republic’s already pressed fishermen.

QUOTE: loss of access to the ocean is indeed a growing problem in the Dominican Republic, say experts. By law, beaches are public, but in reality, most beaches... are now off limits to ordinary Dominicans.

Christian Science Monitor
Jun 29, 2009 Saving Species No Longer a Beauty Contest: Homely Creatures Receiving More Help

QUOTE: [endangered species] funding is supposed to be parceled out to those [endangered species] most at risk, and species at the center of legal fights. But budget data show the beautiful and the edible are still coming out on top. The top 50 best-funded species include salmon, trout, sea turtles, eagles, bears -- and just one insect and no plants.

Washington Post
Dec 04, 2008 Green Inc.: Paying Poor Countries to Save Trees

QUOTE: Scientists and environmentalists want mechanisms to reward the developing world for saving its forests incorporated into any such treaty....furious response from groups that say that the developing world has a right to boost its economic development through forestry.

New York Times
Nov 27, 2008 Dot Earth: The (Tuna) Tragedy of the Commons

QUOTE: in a world seeking to manage limited, shared natural resources while also spurring economic growth — whether the resource is the global atmosphere or an extraordinary half-ton, ocean-roaming predator. The European stance — insisting on a harvest in the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean 50 percent above the limit recommended by scientists — was sharply criticized by environmental campaigners, marine biologists and United States fisheries officials.

New York Times
Nov 08, 2008 Bush’s seven deadly environmental sins: How Bush made a mockery of the nation’s environmental laws and values -- and what Obama must do to get us back on track.

QUOTE: It hardly bears repeating that George W. Bush's record on the environment makes his own father look like Teddy Roosevelt by comparison. By taking environmental policymaking away from scientists, and turning it over to industry cronies, Bush has made a mockery of the nation's environmental laws and values.

Salon
Apr 29, 2008 Noble Eagles, Nasty Pigeons, Biased Humans

QUOTE: Biobigotry is different from the impulse to avoid organisms that can hurt or sicken us, like yellow jackets, mosquitoes or poison ivy, or to fend off traditional household pests like mice and roaches. Rather, it is the dislike we direct toward creatures that live outdoors and generally mind their own business, but that behave in ways we find rude, irritating, selfish or contemptible. The squirrels are gluttons, the crows are schoolyard bullies, the house sparrows are boring and look like mice when they skitter along the ground.

New York Times
Jan 18, 2008 Unintended Consequences: The Case of the Red-Cockaded Woodpecker

QUOTE: ...[economists] found that when the A.D.A. [American With Disabilities Act] was enacted in 1992, it led to a sharp drop in the employment of disabled workers...Employers, concerned that they wouldn’t be able to discipline or fire disabled workers who happened to be incompetent, apparently avoided hiring them in the first place...How long have such do-good laws been backfiring?

New York Times
Jan 13, 2008 In the Farm Bill, a Creature From the Black Lagoon?

QUOTE: But you may be surprised to learn that your tax dollars have helped pave the way for the growth of these livestock megafarms by paying farmers to deal with the mountains of excrement that their farms generate. All of this is carried out under the rubric of “conservation.”

New York Times
Dec 30, 2007 Surge in Off-Roading Stirs Dust and Debate in West

QUOTE: The federal government has been struggling to come up with plans to accommodate the growing numbers of off-highway vehicles — mostly with proposed maps directing them toward designated trails — but all-terrain-vehicle users have started formidable lobbying campaigns when favorite trails have been left off the maps.

New York Times
Nov 30, 2007 Kill the Cat That Kills the Bird?

QUOTE: For more than 20 years, the two sides have exchanged accusations and insults over the issue of cats killing birds...cats are either rhinestone-collared mass murderers or victims of a smear campaign waged by lowdown cat haters...Which was the higher ethical duty, to save the bird or leave the cat unharmed?

New York Times
Nov 28, 2007 Clean energy vs. whales: how to choose? Northwest's dams are a source of clean energy. But scientists say they endanger salmon and orcas.

QUOTE: But thanks largely to hydropower operations on the Columbia and Snake Rivers, the region is relatively green in terms of climate-changing gas emissions compared with other parts of the US. How to reduce the effects, if not the risk, of global warming while also protecting endangered species is the problem.

Christian Science Monitor
Nov 20, 2007 Politics undercut species act, suits say: In a twist, an Interior Department investigation provides much of the grist for the legal action.

QUOTE: The Bush administration is no stranger to being sued under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But in a tack that could signal a major new legal challenge, last week's suits mark one of the few times Interior Department officials have been sued not merely for bureaucratic foot-dragging, but because of deliberate political interference with the ESA, observers say.

Christian Science Monitor
Nov 19, 2007 Chinese Dam Projects Criticized for Their Human Costs (Choking on Growth)

QUOTE: The Three Gorges Dam, then, lies at the uncomfortable center of China’s energy conundrum: The nation’s roaring economy is addicted to dirty, coal-fired power plants that pollute the air and belch greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming. Dams are much cleaner producers of electricity, but they have displaced millions of people in China and carved a stark environmental legacy on the landscape.

New York Times
Nov 02, 2007 Effort to Save Everglades Falters as Funds Drop

QUOTE: The idea that the federal government could summon the will and money to restore the subtle, sodden grandeur of the so-called River of Grass is disappearing, too. Supporters say the effort would get sorely needed momentum from a long-delayed federal bill authorizing $23 billion in water infrastructure projects, including almost $2 billion for the Everglades.

New York Times
Oct 13, 2007 In China, a Lake’s Champion Imperils Himself ("Choking on Growth" part 3 of 10)

QUOTE: Grass-roots environmentalists arguably do more to expose abuses than any edict emanating from Beijing. But they face a political climate that varies from lukewarm tolerance to icy suppression.

New York Times
Oct 03, 2007 Scientists See Politics in Spotted Owl Plan

QUOTE: Six separate peer reviews, five of them funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, all suggest that the agency's revised plan downplayed the importance of protecting old-growth forest in the plan to manage a species that ranges from the Canadian border in Washington state to Northern California.

Washington Post
Sep 07, 2007 New tool to fight global warming: Endangered Species Act? A recent deal to protect the habitat of endangered coral may offer US environmentalists new leverage.

QUOTE: By protecting habitat, not just species, the federal government could be in a position to fight any threats to that habitat, including possibly, global warming, some environmentalists say. While no one expects the US to stop, say, a coal-fired power plant in the Midwest to save Florida coral, the settlement does expand the leverage of the 1973 law that protects species from extinction.

Christian Science Monitor
Aug 28, 2007 As Brazil Defends Its Bounty, Rules Ensnare Scientists

QUOTE: Marc van Roosmalen is a world-renowned primatologist whose research in the Amazon has led to the discovery of five species of monkeys and a new primate genus. But precisely because of that work, Dr. van Roosmalen was recently sentenced to nearly 16 years in prison and jailed in Manaus, Brazil.

New York Times
Aug 27, 2007 Surfers block Hawaii Superferry

QUOTE: The U.S. Coast Guard used force to secure waters around the harbor where swimmers and surfers created a human blockade that had prevented the Superferry's 350-foot-long vessel, the Alakai, from entering the harbor.

Honolulu Advertiser
Jul 25, 2007 Controversy erupts over Endangered Species Act: Congress and the Interior Department investigate whether the Bush administration undermined federal protections.

QUOTE: the US Interior Department is reviewing the scientific integrity of decisions under the law made by a political appointee, who recently resigned under fire. At the same time, Congress is investigating evidence that Vice President Dick Cheney interfered with decisions involving water in California and Oregon...

Christian Science Monitor
Jul 24, 2007 Pressure Builds to Ban Plastic Bags in Stores

QUOTE: fish and birds often die after ingesting discarded plastic bags…. Critics say the ban would be expensive and counterproductive.

New York Times
Jul 23, 2007 In Alaska, a Road Marked With Controversy

QUOTE: proponents say isolated native Alaskans...could die for lack of emergency medical care if federal officials do not allow the road to be built .... But environmentalists say the road would wreak havoc with the heart of one of the most fertile wildlife breeding and feeding sites in the nation...

Washington Post
Jul 21, 2007 U.S. Agency May Reverse 8 Decisions on Wildlife

QUOTE: The Interior Department said Friday that it would review and probably overturn eight decisions on wildlife and land-use issues made by a senior political appointee who has been found to have improperly favored industry and landowners over agency scientists.

New York Times
Jul 06, 2007 Awaiting Internet Access, Remote Brazilian Tribes Debate Its Promise, Peril

QUOTE: The federal government this year announced a new program to provide satellite Internet access to 150 remote communities, in hopes that they will be better equipped to protect themselves against illegal logging and other threats to their culture.

Washington Post
Apr 23, 2007 Climate Change Adds Twist to Debate Over Dams

QUOTE: The power company that owns four hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River says the dams provide a crucial source of so-called clean energy at a time when carbon emissions have become one of the world’s foremost environmental concerns. But the American Indians, fishermen and environmentalists who want the dams removed...say the dams are anything but clean.

New York Times
Apr 21, 2007 Invisible but all too real: the illegal roads speeding the destruction of the rain forest: Despite a crackdown, illicit logging is on the rise in lawless areas of the Amazon

QUOTE: Illegal roads, or viscinais - often built by illegal loggers looking to cash in on the world's largest rainforest - represent one of the biggest challenges to the Brazilian government in its fight against deforestation. It is estimated that there are more than 105,000 miles of viscinais in the Amazon region - illegal dirt tracks that meander through indigenous territories, government land and ecological reserves and which pave the way for the continued destruction of the world's largest rainforest.

Guardian Unlimited
Apr 19, 2007 Global Effort to Save Endangered Crops Gets $37.5 Million Infusion

QUOTE: The project, undertaken by the Global Crop Diversity Trust and the United Nations Foundation, will focus particular attention on “orphan” crops — like cassava, coconut and taro — that are staples in poor countries but have not been the focus of commercial plant breeders.

New York Times
Oct 31, 2006 Gulf fishermen feud over net 'curtains': Gillnetting, still allowed in Alabama, is the target of sports fishing industry and conservationists.

QUOTE: Are these net-haulers guardians of a traditional way, or are they outlaws who are robbing the ocean of resources and undermining the larger economic good?

Christian Science Monitor
Oct 08, 2006 U.S. Attempting to Reshape Fishing Rules: U.S. Attempting to Reshape Fishing Rules

QUOTE: several regional councils allow catches above the scientifically recommended levels on the theory that deeper cuts will hurt fishing interests too much. Scientists told the Gulf of Mexico council this year that the red snapper catch would have to be held to 5 million pounds to allow the population to recover immediately, and a limit of 7 million pounds would restore it by 2009. Instead, the council endorsed a catch limit of 9.1 million pounds.

Washington Post
Sep 04, 2006 True Wilderness, and False

QUOTE: This is, in short, a raid on national resources aimed at helping private developers. It is the worst sort of Congressional earmarking. And it gives true wilderness bills a reputation they do not deserve.

New York Times
Aug 22, 2006 New outlaws plague Arizona desert refuges

QUOTE: Aggressive crackdowns along the border in recent years in places such as San Diego and El Paso have pushed illegal immigrants and drug smugglers into remote desert areas in southern Arizona...employees...are dealing more with the effects of illegal immigration, instead of protecting wildlife and helping visitors.

USA TODAY
Aug 06, 2006 Debating the Course of Chile's Rivers

QUOTE: “We make sacrifices to live here, including the highest cost of living and putting up with few paved roads or schools, and how does the country respond?” the mayor here, David Sandoval, asked in an interview. “They tell us we have to hand over the energy potential we have and not expect anything in return.”

New York Times
Jun 22, 2006 In Zimbabwe, Ragtag Scouts Vs. Poachers: On foot and with few resources, the Victoria Falls Anti-Poaching Unit wields little but hope in its effort to save dwindling wildlife.

QUOTE: On foot and with few resources, the Victoria Falls Anti-Poaching Unit wields little but hope in its effort to save dwindling wildlife...hungry locals are setting tens of thousands of snares to catch protected animals...

Christian Science Monitor
Jun 14, 2006 With Oregon timber sale, controversy flares: A US auction of fire-damaged trees renews a forest-management debate.

QUOTE: Congress is moving toward allowing more salvage logging in roadless federal forest areas...But many forest ecologists say such logging inhibits natural regeneration, resulting in young, even-age forests more prone to future fires.

Christian Science Monitor
Jun 13, 2006 In Africa, China Trade Brings Growth, Unease: Asian Giant's Appetite for Raw Materials, Markets Has Some Questioning Its Impact on Continent

QUOTE: African and Western activists say China's increasingly close ties to the troubled governments in Angola, Nigeria, Sudan and Zimbabwe are undermining efforts to nurture democracy and improve human rights.

Washington Post
May 31, 2006 Questions About Salmon Are Directed Upstream

QUOTE: the agency responsible for protecting endangered salmon..has instructed its representatives and scientists in the West to route media questions about salmon back to headquarters. Only three people in the entire agency, all of them political appointees, are now authorized to speak of salmon...

Washington Post
May 14, 2006 A Storm Blows In Along With the Wind: Project Planned Off Cape Cod Shows Contentiousness in Energy Development

QUOTE: Proponents of the Cape Wind project on Nantucket Sound say wind farms like it will help wean the country from dependence on foreign oil. Opponents suggest it will harm the area's environment, scenic views and economy. And both sides insist wealthy interests are doing their best to manipulate the decision-making process by hiring high-priced lobbyists and cutting backroom deals on Capitol Hill.

Washington Post
Mar 22, 2006 Illegal Logging May Supply U.S. Floors: Firms Fail to Ensure Origin of a Threatened, Luxurious Wood, Group Alleges

QUOTE: A variety of hardwood threatened in Southeast Asia is showing up in flooring in the United States, where manufacturers, distributors and retailers are failing to ensure the wood's legal origin...

Washington Post
Jan 06, 2006 A GOP Key to Unlocking NEPA: Party Links Environmental Law to Delay, Paperwork, Lawsuits

QUOTE: House Republicans are hoping to rewrite one of the nation's most sweeping environmental laws....Deborah K. Sease, legislative director for the Sierra Club, said the language in the report was so "vague, you open the door to undermining the principles of NEPA."

Washington Post
Dec 28, 2005 The Elephant in the Room: U.S. Zoos Struggle With Question of Keeping Pachyderms in Captivity

QUOTE: The group maintains that elephants are roaming and foraging animals and need more space than zoos can give them. It and other animal rights activists say that penned-in elephants tend to get diseases and injuries they would not get in the wild.

Washington Post
Dec 07, 2005 Developers Sentenced in Wetlands Case

QUOTE: A federal judge sentenced three Mississippi real estate developers to prison yesterday for filling in wetlands and selling the property to low- and fixed-income families, marking the end of the nation's largest wetlands criminal prosecution.

Washington Post
Nov 30, 2005 Zeroing Out the Messenger: Idaho Senator Eliminates Funds for Center on Salmon Survival

QUOTE: The Fish Passage Center, with just 12 employees and a budget of $1.3 million, has been killed because it did not count fish in a way that suited Craig.

Washington Post

96 Articles and Resources. Go to:  [Next 46]