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Date Fairness.com Resource Read it at:
Jun 05, 2016 Panama Papers Show How Rich United States Clients Hid Millions Abroad

QUOTE: These transactions and others like them for a stable of wealthy clients from the United States are outlined in extraordinary detail in the trove of internal Mossack Fonseca documents known as the Panama Papers. The materials were obtained by the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, and have now been shared with The New York Times. In recent weeks, the papers’ revelations about Mossack Fonseca’s international clientele have shaken the financial world. The Times’s examination of the files found that Mossack Fonseca also had at least 2,400 United States-based clients over the past decade, and set up at least 2,800 companies on their behalf in the British Virgin Islands, Panama, the Seychelles and other jurisdictions that specialize in helping hide wealth.

New York Times
Oct 07, 2007 The World: Living in Exile Isn’t What It Used to Be

QUOTE: Argentina, Bolivia, Ecuador, Haiti and Venezuela are all discussing ways of bringing former leaders out of exile to face human rights or corruption charges, and legal experts expect these various efforts to be energized by a ruling by Chile’s Supreme Court ordering that Mr. Fujimori be sent to a jail cell in Peru to await trial.

New York Times
May 11, 2007 Bush and Democrats in Accord on Trade Deals

QUOTE: The unusual agreement, which came after weeks of negotiations, would guarantee workers the right to organize, ban child labor and prohibit forced labor in trading-partner countries. It would also require trading partners to enforce environmental laws already on their books and comply with several international environmental agreements.

New York Times
May 06, 2007 From China to Panama, a Trail of Poisoned Medicine

QUOTE: The syrupy poison, diethylene glycol, is an indispensable part of the modern world, an industrial solvent and prime ingredient in some antifreeze. It is also a killer. And the deaths, if not intentional, are often no accident. Over the years, the poison has been loaded into all varieties of medicine — cough syrup, fever medication, injectable drugs — a result of counterfeiters who profit by substituting the sweet-tasting solvent for a safe, more expensive syrup, usually glycerin, commonly used in drugs, food, toothpaste and other products.

New York Times
Apr 13, 2005 U.S. Asylum Sought by Cuban Tied to Terror Cases

QUOTE: Luis Posada Carriles, a CIA-trained Cuban exile implicated in a series of terrorist incidents, applied for political asylum in the United States yesterday, prompting at least one congressman to assert that granting the request would undermine the nation's credibility in the war on terrorism.

Washington Post
Sep 26, 2004 TATTOOED WARRIORS: The Next Generation; Shuttling Between Nations, Latino Gangs Confound the Law

QUOTE:...many human rights advocates and community leaders worry that the aggressive measures governments are taking against gangs have not solved the problem as much as they have spread it.

New York Times
Apr 30, 2004 Study Finds 25 Nations Hindered by Corruption

QUOTE: A survey of government accountability and openness in 25 countries around the globe has found that each one is challenged by corruption and lacks sufficient protections against electoral abuses, including developed democracies such as the United States, Germany and Japan.

Washington Post
Sep 17, 2001 A New War and Its Scale

QUOTE: The military action being planned for Afghanistan is part of a broader diplomatic as well as military policy of holding nations accountable that provide aid and comfort to terrorists.

New York Times
Mar 06, 2001 New Files Tie U.S. to Deaths of Latin Leftists in 1970's

QUOTE: [A recently declassified State Department] cable appeared to open new avenues of inquiry about the American role in Condor, a shadowy operation to stamp out the Latin American left that, among other things, dispatched death squads to kill critics at home and overseas.

New York Times